TIM KAINE: Solid Citizen. Key Facts Why He IS Right for VP

OneWorld Progressive InstituteOneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do at any given time and on an ongoing basis.  We invite and appreciate technical and financial support.

Timothy Michael Kaine Selected As Hillary Clinton’s VP Choice

Hillary Clinton has selected Senator Tim Kaine as her VP running mate.  Senator Kaine has been on the vice presidential running mate screen since President Obama first ran in 2008.  For whatever reason her was not selected then, this is the right time for him.  He is a remarkable person. Amazingly, the first thing Donald Trump tweeted about senator Kaine was a negative and malicious statement.  Interestingly, Donald Trump is one of the most devious, corrupt and destructive persons to have competed for public office in the past 50 years.  The old saying ‘people who live in glass houses should NOT throw stones’ certainly applies to Trump.  However, he believes he can lie and deceive his way out of every situation and that he can pull the wool over everyone’s eyes.  On hearing about the VP selection, Trump immediately sent out a nasty tweet calling Kaine corrupt.  Trump tries to “frame” all of his competitors in the most negative terms even when he knows he is lying.  However, this is not about tricky Trump; it is about the remarkable Timothy Kaine.

Tim Kaine’s faith is a guiding element in his life’s work, and in 2013 he said the following about the influence of faith and religion in his life:

“What I’ve always said to candidates, Democrats or others: ‘Share what motivates you.’ Share your motivations even before you share your policies, because people want to know your motivations to make a gauge of your authenticity. And for me, my motivation is a spiritual and religious one.”

If the Democrats win the White House in November, Kaine would serve as only the second Roman Catholic vice president in American history, with his predecessor, Joe Biden, serving as the first. Here are a few relevant religious-related facts about Tim Kaine:

  • a) He Was Raised Catholic & Educated by Jesuits
  • b) He Served as a Missionary in Honduras
  • c) He & His Wife Have Been Members of the Same Church For 30 Years
  • d) He Struggles With ‘Issues of Congruence Between Life & Faith’
  • e) He Believes Women Should Be Allowed To Become Priests. Here is a statement he made about women becoming priests: “If women are not accorded equal place in the leadership of the Catholic Church and the other great world religions, they will always be treated as inferiors in earthly matters as well. There is nothing this Pope could do that would improve the world as much as putting the Church on a path to ordain women.”

Tim Kaine: Everything You Need to Know

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/tim-kaine/story?  July 22, 2016, By JESSICA HOPPER

Kaine has significant political experience and widespread demographic appeal. He was a leading choice for then-Senator Barack Obama’s vice presidential running mate in 2008, and was the first Senator to endorse Hillary Clinton for the Democratic presidential nominee in 2014.

Here’s what you need to know about Tim Kaine, junior Democratic Senator from Virginia and vice presidential candidate.

Tim Kaine and Barack Obama, Tim Kaine vice president, Tim Kaine

Tim Kaine was a leading veep-stakes choice for President Obama in the 2008 election. (Getty)

I’m thrilled to announce my running mate, @TimKaine, a man who’s devoted his life to fighting for others.

Hillary Clinton announced over the weekend that Tim Kaine, the junior Senator from Virginia, is her vice presidential running mate on the Democratic ticket. Clinton made the announcement via Twitter.

1. He Has More Than 20 Years of Political Experience

Kaine has spent more than one-third of his life in state and national politics. He served as a Richmond city council member from 1994 until 1998 and mayor of Richmond from 1998 until 2001. From 2002 until 2005 he was lieutenant governor and then governor of Virginia from 2006 until 2010. In 2009 he was elected chair of the Democratic National Committee, serving until he was elected Senator from Virginia in 2012. Kaine currently serves on the Foreign Relations and Senate Armed Services committees.

2. Kaine Appeals to a Broad Donor & Voter Base:

Kaine is popular with a wide base of donors and voters, evidenced by the fact that he has never lost an election. He has the ability to excite the Democratic base and may appeal to Independents and moderate Republicans, particularly in light of his less left-leaning stances on abortion and trade, his strong Catholic faith, and his endorsement by former Republican governor of Virginia Lindwood Holton (who also happens to be his father-in-law).

Kaine’s personal background also makes him attractive to both minority and white voters. Before becoming a politician he practiced as a civil rights attorney for 17 years. He is a member of and regular attendee at a predominantly black church, and he speaks Spanish fluently as a result of running a vocation school for teenage boys while a missionary in Honduras.

3. He Met His Wife While They Were Both Studying at Harvard Law School.

Kaine earned his B.A. in economics from the University of Missouri, before attending Harvard Law School, where he met his wife Anne Holton in a study group. The couple were married in 1984, a year after Kaine graduated from Harvard with a Juris Doctor and was admitted to the Virginia bar. Kaine and Holton have three grown children: Annella, Woody, and Nat.

a) Holton has extensive experience in the Virginia legal and education systems.

b) She served as a legal aid lawyer for low-income families and is also a former Richmond Juvenile Court Judge.

c) Holton has won numerous awards for her fight to reform the foster care system. She is now the secretary of education in Virginia.

d) For more than 30 years Kaine and Holton have lived in the same Richmond neighborhood and sent their children to public school.

e) According to Roll Call, Kaine’s total wealth is valued at approximately $710,000, making him the 228th wealthiest of 541 members of Congress, below the Senate average and well below fellow Virginia Senator Mark Warner.

4. He Differs With Clinton on Issues of Abortion and Trade.

While Clinton and Kaine have similar views on most issues, including tax reform, same-sex marriage, and Obamacare, they differ on the issues of abortion and trade, specifically the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

Kaine opposes abortion on religious grounds, but does not believe in overturning Roe vs. Wade or restricting public abortion funding. He does, however, believe in restricting partial-birth abortions, parental consent, and informed consent. He also favors the promotion of abstinence-based education. These are center of Clinton‘s more liberal pro-choice views, however Kaine has recently exhibited more pro-choice views that would better align with Clinton.

While Clinton and Kaine have similar views on most issues, including tax reform, same-sex marriage, and Obamacare, they differ on the issues of abortion and trade, specifically the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

5. Timothy Michael (Tim) Kaine is an excellent and wise choice for vice president in 2016 because he is a well qualified, widely experienced in all levels of public service, speaks Spanish fluently, and a solid citizen who takes public service, and the role of government in enhancing the lives of Americans and constituents, seriously.  Here are a few highlights of his political life:

a) He served as the Mayor of Richmond, Virginia, a large urban and multicultural area, from 1998 until he was elected Lieut. Gov in 2001

b) He served as Lieut Governor of Virginia from 2002-2006

c) He served as Governor of Virginia from 2006 – 2010

d) He served as the Democratic National Committee Chair 2009-2011

e)  He was elected to the United States Senate in 2012. He has served on some key committees (including Foreign Relations and Foreign Affairs) that give him broad international experience; he is also considered to be a policy wonk.

f)  Being vice president is the natural progression for Tim Kaine, and he will help Hillary Clinton and America in numerous positive ways.

g)  Tim Kaine is one of only 20 people in American history to have served as a Mayor, Governor and United States Senator.

Other links with information about Tim Kaine:

Please make sure that you are registered in a timely way and that you VOTE on Nov. 8, 2016.  Democracy only works well if all who can participate do so regularly.  Voting is the most effective way that all citizens can voice their opinions on all levels of government.

PLEASE VOTE IN 2016!  AMERICA’S FUTURE DEPENDS ON IT.

Below are links to a few of OneWorld’s community information and engagement video programs.  We invite you to watch, listen and share these with others.  You can find more videos on how we engage young people here:  https://youtu.be/u-XVPAogMXg 

We at OneWorld invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support. Write to us at: OneWorld, Inc. P.O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531

Read More      No Comments

A Teacher’s Reward: The Secret Power of Being An Educator

OneWorld Progressive Institute

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since June 1996. We produce three categories of television programs and community forums: Education, Health Literacy and Civic Engagement. 

This blog titled “A Teachers Reward” comes in its entirety from Medium; it’s an information source to which OneWorld subscribes.  We have made it available here to our readers because we find the blog to be highly valuable.  We hope our readers will take the time to read it. The bold highlights and bullets in sections were added by OneWorld  for ease of reading and emphasis. We have also added links to a few of our recent education programs and student activities. We ask for your support  to continue our efforts.

“Let me tell you a story. It’s about a student I had a couple of years ago, back before I was a full-time writer, when I taught science at a low-income middle school in South Houston, a subsection of the city that is predominantly Hispanic (I taught from 2006–2015; I became a full-time writer in 2015). I was thinking about the kid recently — about a bunch of my kids, really — because there was news about Jaime Escalante, the teacher made famous by the 1988 movie Stand and Deliver, who was honored by the USPS with a commemorative stamp.

“I’d watched Stand and Deliver before I was a teacher and I thought it was a good enough movie. But I was really drawn in by Escalante after I became a teacher. He was exactly the sort of teacher that I always wanted to be. I’m sure a part of that pull was a natural gravity — he looked just like one of my uncles (Escalante was actually Bolivian, not Mexican, but it was close enough for me) and sounded like nearly every old man in the neighborhood where I grew up. It’s a powerful thing to see somebody that could be you working professionally in a position that you admire. But more than that, he wanted to be in that particular classroom (desolate and nearly hopeless) with those particular kids (impoverished and largely Latino).

“In college, I had a professor named Dr. Strauss. She taught a psychology class I needed for my degree. There weren’t many people in there — maybe 15, 16 of us, tops — so I don’t know if she made it a point to spend time with each of us individually. But after two or three weeks, she asked me to stop by her office. I was surprised by her request because I’d never had a professor ask to speak outside of class. Initially, I thought I was in trouble. And in a way, I was.

On the day of our meeting, I walked over to her building and then to her floor and then to her office and then to the chair in front of her desk. I said “hello” and she said “hello” and I sat down and we started talking. And it quickly became obvious that I was only there because she wanted to talk with me about being Mexican. She asked a lot of questions about my parents and my family. She asked about how I was raised. She asked if I’d ever heard of LULAC (nope) and if I’d received any scholarships (super nope). Then she asked what sort of job I wanted when I graduated and that’s the part of the conversation that has always stuck with me, and likely always will.

“I told her I wanted to be a teacher, and she said that was good. Then she asked if I’d gotten to a point yet where I was starting to feel an obligation to anyone besides myself. I didn’t really understand the question, so I said something like, “I don’t really understand the question.” So she said, and I’m paraphrasing here because this was a conversation that happened 15 years ago, but she said, “OK, let me ask you a different way. You said you grew up on the South Side of San Antonio, right?”

Correct.

“And it was a predominantly Hispanic community, right?”

Very much so.

“And you were there your whole life, right? Surrounded by Latinos? Went to elementary there? Middle school there? High school there?”

Yes, yes, yes, yes, and yes.

“OK. In your 13 years of being in school, kindergarten through 12th grade, how many teachers did you have that were male and also Hispanic?”

“I could only come up with one. His name was Mr. Hernandez and I had him for a music class in middle school for a semester. Other than that, there was nobody else. Not in math, not in science, not in reading, nothing. Of all of the teachers I’d ever had, and living in area like the one I was living in, only one was a Hispanic male. She asked if I thought that was strange. I told her I’d never thought about it before. She asked why not. I said, “I don’t know. I just didn’t.” She said, “Well, you’re going to be a teacher. So think about it.” Then she asked me to leave.

Teaching was a far more intense job than I’d anticipated. You have to learn the curriculum. You have to learn how to test the curriculum. You have to learn how to manage children who think they’re grown-ups (and how to manage grown-ups that behave like children). You have to learn how to weave differentiated instruction into the lessons you’re building and also you have to learn  what “differentiated instruction” means.
  • You have to learn how to manage the tiny amount of time you get with each class each day.
  • You have to learn when and how to discipline your students and you have to learn when and how to let them just exist as children, because they are children.
  • You have to learn all of that. Every single piece. It’s all important. But you only ever really have to be good at one thing: Making sure your students know that you absolutely, no question, no doubt, for sure, 100 percent want to be in that particular classroom with those particular kids. If you do that, shit usually works out.

Anyway, the story I promised:

“In 2011, I had a Vietnamese student named Quoc. He was a gem. He spoke very little English (I taught the ESL population), but he was so charming and outgoing that it rarely seemed to matter. I remember at the start of one class, as a quick warm-up exercise, I asked the kids to draw an example of an interaction in an ecosystem. We’d spent the previous day talking about mutualism and commensalism and parasitism, and during the lesson I had a slideshow with video clips of pairs of animals interacting. The warm-up was meant to be a refresher before we moved onto the next thing.

“I gave everyone five minutes to finish. After about three or so minutes, I started wandering around the room, peeking over shoulders to needle kids about how poorly drawn their lions were. When I got near Quoc’s table, he immediately folded up the page that he was working on and stuffed it in his pocket.

I said, “Quoc, what’s up? What ya’ got there?”

He just looked at me and smiled, but he didn’t say anything.

I said, “Quoc, what’d you draw? Let me see.”

He squeaked, “No.”

I said, “Boy, if you don’t give me that paper, I’ma wop you in the head with this meter stick.” (I was holding a meter stick.) (I wasn’t actually going to wop him.) (I think I led the league in threatening to wop kids in the head with a meter stick for the duration of my teaching career.) (I was last place in AWD [Actual Wops Delivered].)

Quoc reached in his pocket, took out the paper, handed it to me, then put his head down on the table in embarrassment. I began to open the paper, and as I was doing so I could feel the other kids in the classroom looking at me because middle-school kids have heavy, clumsy stares. I got the page all the way unfolded. I must have made a face because one of the girls sitting nearby asked, “What is it?”

Do you know what it was? I’ll tell you what it was. I’ll tell you exactly what he drew on that piece of paper when I asked everyone in the class to draw an example of interaction in an ecosystem because I will never ever forget it for the rest of my life. He drew a picture of a duck. It was standing next to a turtle. The duck was telling the turtle, “Fuck you,” except he spelled it “Fack you.”

I was so goddamn happy when I saw it. I didn’t even try not to laugh. Matter of fact, I laughed very loudly. The girl asked again, “What is it?” I said, “Quoc drew a picture of a duck cussing out a turtle.” She said, “Oh.”

I don’t know if he drew it hoping it was the correct answer or if he was just looking for a reason to use to the word fuck (or fack). Either way, it was great. I think I lived on that moment as a teacher for a good three, maybe four weeks.

There are big, obvious, expected moments built into the school year that help you stay engaged and focused. Like when it’s time for the state-mandated tests that get used to determine if a kid gets promoted (and how effective you are as a teacher) or the year-end graduation ceremonies. Those are always there, and you know when they’ll arrive. But just because you know they’re coming doesn’t make them any less meaningful — getting to tell a student I care that he or she passed the STAAR test and would be promoted to the next grade was always an emotional, rewarding moment. It was as good as it was pulverizing when I had to tell someone he or she was a couple of questions short and didn’t make it and failed for the year.

But those small, unpredictable, unexpected moments that happen are the ones that stay with you the longest.

“The last scene of Stand and Deliver is a long shot of Jaime Escalante, played by Edward James Olmos, walking down the hallway of his school toward the exit doors. It happens after the principal of the school shares a phone call with someone who tells him that Escalante’s students, a group of poor Mexican kids who’d been accused of cheating because they all scored so well on a statewide AP calculus exam, had been cleared of any wrongdoing. As he walks down the hallway, text appears on the screen. It reads, “In 1982, Garfield H.S. had 18 students pass the A.P. Calculus Exam,” and every few seconds the number for the year increases and the number for the amount of students that passed the exam increases (1983, 31; 1984, 63; 1985, 77; etc.).

“As Escalante reaches the door, he does a quick but easy-to-see single fist pump. He isn’t celebrating for himself. He’s celebrating for his students.

“I always wondered what smaller moments Escalante kept with him, that he celebrated, that he told to friends over drinks or shared with his family at the dinner table. Who was his Quoc? Every teacher has them. I’m guessing every person in every profession does. But I know every teacher has them. I wonder what his were.

https://youtu.be/eI7iV9fvLKM – Women of Color Pursuing Careers in Science & Medicine (2016)

https://youtu.be/nXeZgf7VXNk – Building Success Pathways for ALL Students  (2016) High and Middle School principals joined N’Zinga Shäni to discuss the importance of helping all students to succeed academically.

https://youtu.be/u-XVPAogMXgEngaging Students Positively in Education and Politics (2015) A forum with high school students

https://youtu.be/8r1OK5Comt8 – Paper Bag Principle-  BHM Civic Engagement Forum 2015.  A dynamic and informative program hosted by professor Antoinette Brim.

https://youtu.be/VHIg4SY4V14  Excerpts from OneWorld’s 2014 Oratory Competition finals.  Due to a lack of funds we have not been able to present more oratory competitions since 2014. 

If individuals or business organizations which to sponsor an Oratory Competition, we would welcome it.  You may reach us by sending an email to:  nzingashanis@yahoo.com

 OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions.   Our Radio programs air on 103.5FM, WNHH.  Our television programs air on Comcast Channels 10, 15, 18 and 26, and on Charter Communications Chan. 21. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do on an ongoing basis.  We are always looking for video editors,  technical help and financial contributions.

We at OneWorld invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support. Write to us at: OneWorld, Inc. P.O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531

Read More      No Comments

Should A Supreme Court Justice Speak/Gesture Politically?

OneWorld Progressive Institute

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since June 1996.

Ever so often there are debates in the NY Times.  The topics are quite interesting.  Unfortunately, many people do not have access to the Times. Whenever we find a topic that is of particular interest and we want to engage our teens and community, we try to make that topic and the resulting debate available here on our blog pages.  We find this particular topic fascinating.  The question is:

“Can a Supreme Court Justice Denounce a (political) Candidate?”

OneWorld wants to broaden the question and ask instead:

Should a sitting Supreme Court Justice make comments or gestures that reflect politically on any matter that might come before the Supreme court in the future?

Below is what Justice Ginsburg said.  She has also since apologized saying she will not make such comments in the future. The debaters weighed in before she made her apology.  OneWorld believes there is great value in the debate. It allows our young people to reflect seriously on such matters. Read her regrets here: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/15/us/politics/ruth-bader-ginsburg-donald-trump.html

“Judges should avoid commenting on a candidate for public office,” she wrote in a brief statement issued by the court, admitting her remarks were “ill advised” and expressing regret. “In the future I will be more circumspect.”

It’s of interest that during the State of the Union address on Jan. 27, 2010, Justice Alito shook his head and mouthed “not true” while the President was making a statement.  That was extremely inappropriate; in fact, it was outrageous that Alito so disrespected the President. Where was the outrage then?!   The mainstream media hardly made a peep.  The Washington Post page, which had a substantial article on the matter has been removed.  Only the alternative media’s comments remain today:  http://www.politico.com/blogs/politicolive/0110/Justice_Alitos_You_lie_moment_Page4.html   This was very different; Justice Ginsburg was giving an interview and responded to a question.  However, it might have been best if — as a sitting justice –she had not given her factual opinion of Donald Trump.

rfdginsburg

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Mike Groll/Associated Press

“I can’t imagine what this place would be — I can’t imagine what the country would be — with Donald Trump as our president,” Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said in an interview on Friday. Trump’s election would have led her late husband to say, “‘Now it’s time for us to move to New Zealand,’” she added.  Her comments raised eyebrows even among her fans in the legal community. Is it ever appropriate for justices to announce a partisan position in an election?

Paul Butler

“Ginsburg Knows, If Trump Wins, the Rule of Law Is at Risk.” 

When despots have ascended to power, how should judges have responded? Should they have adhered to a code of silence as their country went to hell?

Stephen Gillers

It’s Clearly Not Right

We want the public to view judicial rulings solely as the product of law and legal reasoning, uninfluenced by political considerations.  “Much as I admire Justice Ginsburg, her comments about Donald Trump were wrong and harm the courts.

Much as I wish it were otherwise, there is no way to read these remarks as nonpolitical. The clear message is that Ginsburg believes that Donald Trump will be bad for the country and the court. I agree, but a Supreme Court justice should not say so.

We want the public to view judicial rulings solely as the product of law and legal reasoning, uninfluenced by political considerations.

The Code of Conduct for U.S. Judges says that judges should not “make speeches for a political candidate, or publicly endorse or oppose a candidate for public office” or “engage in any other political activity.”

Although this language binds every lower court federal judge, it does not bind the justices. Many who study judicial ethics think it should. Seeking to allay concerns, Chief Justice John G. Roberts wrote in a 2011 year-end report that the justices do in fact “consult the Code of Conduct” and that the code “plays the same role for the justices as it does for other federal judges.”

Erwin Chemerinsky

Justices Have Free Speech Rights Too

“I would always rather know what justices and judges think rather than have enforced silence and pretend they have no views.”

“Surely no one was surprised by any of the views expressed by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in an interview with The New York Times reporter Adam Liptak, though it is surprising for a Supreme Court justice to be so candid. This, however, is part of a trend in the past several years where many of the justices have spoken publicly and I think this is a very good development. More speech, especially by thoughtful people, is almost always desirable in a democratic society.

I would always rather know what justices and judges think rather than have enforced silence and pretend they have no views.

There was nothing surprising in Justice Ginsburg expressing pleasure at the abortion and affirmative action decisions from the last few weeks; she was in the majority in both cases. Nor was anyone shocked to learn that she thought that the court was wrong in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, in holding that corporations could spend unlimited money in election campaigns, or in District of Columbia v. Heller, in striking down a city’s ban on handguns. She dissented in both cases. Quite important, she did not comment on any case now pending before the court or say anything that could not already be inferred from her past votes.
Nor was it surprising that she praised President Obama’s nominee for the Supreme Court, Judge Merrick Garland, and expressed her view that the court’s work is hindered by the Senate’s failure to consider him. I wish that more of the justices would explain that the Senate’s refusal to consider this nomination, as well as nominations for lower federal court judgeships, is seriously interfering with the functioning of the courts. ”

Paul Butler is a former federal prosecutor and a law professor at Georgetown University Law Center. He is the author of “Let’s Get Free: A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice.” B.A., Yale; J.D., Harvard

“Normally Supreme Court justices should refrain from commenting on partisan politics. But these are not normal times. The question is whether a Supreme Court justice – in this case, the second woman on the court, a civil rights icon and pioneering feminist — has an obligation to remain silent when the country is at risk of being ruled by a man who has repeatedly demonstrated that he is a sexist and racist demagogue. The answer must be no.

When despots have ascended to power, how should judges have responded? Should they have adhered to a code of silence as their country went to hell?

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s recent critique of Donald Trump has drawn bipartisan jeers. Ginsburg is being pilloried for publicly saying what many other Americans think, likely including some of her colleagues on the Supreme Court.

Still I understand the concern about Ginsburg going public with her views. Perceptions are important for the legitimacy of the Supreme Court — that’s why the justices wear those silly black robes, sit high on a bench, and make everybody stand up when they enter the courtroom. Pretending that they are above the political fray is part of the same bag of tricks.

It is significant that Ginsburg chose to speak out now. She has been on the court during the presidential campaigns of several conservative Republicans, including George W. Bush, John McCain and Mitt Romney. She never criticized them. But there is, as even many Republicans have acknowledged, something different about the Donald.

It’s not just Trump’s misogyny.

It’s not only that he described Mexican immigrants as rapists and proposed barring Muslims from entering the United States.

It’s not just that he questions whether Mexican-American and Muslim-American judges are capable of being fair to him.

It’s not just his statement, as an African-American protester was being ejected from one of his rallies: “See in the good old days this didn’t happen because they used to treat them very very rough.”

It’s not only that Trump was reluctant to reject the endorsement of white supremacist David Duke, or that he has found nice things to say about Saddam Hussein, Vladimir Putin and Kim Jong Un.

It’s also that Trump has no governing principles or coherent ideologies other than “believe me and do what I say” and an appeal to a radical ethnocentrism among white people. This is the mark of a fascist.

When despots have ascended to power in other regimes, one wonders how judges should have responded. Should they have adhered to a code of silence while their country went to hell? Not on the watch of the Notorious R.B.G. She understands that if Trump wins, the rule of law is at risk.

In speaking out, Ginsburg has refused to elevate the appearance of justice over justice itself. The Washington chattering classes may not appreciate the breach of protocol, but history — should the United States remain a democracy – will be a kinder judge.”

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2016/07/12/can-a-supreme-court-justice-denounce-a-candidate?

In Jan 2010, while President Obama was delivering the State of the Union address, Justice Samuel Alito grossly disrespected the President by shaking his head and mouthing the words “not true” to a statement made by the President. Republicans and some reporters often disrespect the President by addressing him as Mr. Obama and refusing to use his title.

http://www.politico.com/blogs/politicolive/0110/Justice_Alitos_You_lie_moment_Page4.html

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions.   Our Radio programs air on 103.5FM, WNHH.  Our television programs air on Comcast Channels 10, 15, 18 and 26, and on Charter Communications Chan. 21. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do on an ongoing basis.  We are always looking for video editors and technical help

We at OneWorld invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support. Write to us at: OneWorld, Inc. P.O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531

Read More      No Comments

The Invisibility of Black Women Who DIE In Police Custody

OneWorld Progressive Institute

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996. We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement.  We also encourage and promote community dialogue and a radio program on WNHH 103.5FM. We invite input from the community and welcome your support.  Please watch our programs on your public access channels in southern CT, and visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6

Image of faculty member, Yohuru Williams Dr. Williams is a contributing member of OneWorld and a professor and Dean at Fairfield University.  He writes blogs for the Huffington Post.  Below is a blog he wrote in August 2015.  We invite you to read and share it, and see if there are ways in which you can contribute positively to furthering the causes for which Dr. Williams and OneWorld advocate.

Can You See Me Now: Raynette Turner, Sandra Bland and the Invisibility of Black Women

(8/13/2015 11:50 am)

“When her body was discovered in a cell at the Mount Vernon police lockup on July 27, 42-year-old Raynette Turner became the fifth Black woman to die in police custody during the month of July. Arrested for allegedly stealing crab legs from a local market, the mother of eight became ill the day after her arrest and asked to be taken to the hospital where she was ostensibly seen but not admitted. The following day authorities found her dead in her cell just below the courtroom where her husband Herman Turner waited for more than two hours for her arraignment. (Highlights added by OneWorld)

“In an interview, Mr. Turner lashed out at police for the lapses that may have contributed to his partner’s death. Apparently jail personnel cannot account for a substantial block of time during Mrs. Turner’s stay in their custody. While established protocol at the jail dictates that someone must check in on prisoners every 15 minutes, more than an hour may have passed from the time when Raynette Turner was last seen alive between noon and 1 p.m. and the discovery of her body at 2 pm. Hinting at the strong possibility of a “cover up,” Herman Turner further protested, “If they [Mount Vernon police] did their job, she would still be alive.”

“So why did Mount Vernon authorities fail to appreciate the seriousness of Raynette Turner’s condition? In addition, how will they ultimately account for the missing checks on a prisoner who was ill enough to be taken to the hospital while in their custody? If past history is any indication, they won’t have to account for either because of Raynette Turner’s race as well as her gender. Women of color in general and Black women in particular remain largely invisible.

More than a decade ago, Kimberlé Crenshaw described the concept of intersectionality, explaining the interlocking nature of oppressions. She illustrated the ways in which Black women remain marginal. If the dead women were white, would the rash of questionable deaths in police custody have engendered a national backlash and debate?

Even in the unprecedented coverage of the case of 28-year-old Sandra Bland, who Texas authorities discovered hanging in her cell on July 13 following her arrest during a routine traffic stop, she like Raynette Turner remains largely unseen. Their deaths failed to ignite the same degree of passion as the killings of Black men in police custody.

To be sure the Bland’s death helped sustain a national debate on the treatment of people of color by police, but there is something unique about the Bland case. In the midst of substantial mainstream media coverage, Sandra Bland remains invisible. In spite of the video of her arrest, the salvaging of her social media accounts demonstrating her support of the Black Lives Matter movement, along with rumors of her struggles with depression that authorities tried to use to explain away her death, the real Sandra Bland remains elusive. Intelligent and attractive, she is not easily reduced to racial troupes. She was neither angry nor “uppity”. The video of her encounter with the arresting officer is surreal in much the same way other documented video encounters of African Americans with the police turn bizarre and tragic as tensions escalate. It is a new genre of American horror with old roots. In the days before police body cams and cell phone video, it was the type of racial terror that adults cautioned young people about – the danger of being Black in America. (Highlights added by OneWorld)

In its present incarnation, the horror comes not from blood-thirsty lynch mobs or cross-burning bands of terrorists encased in white, but the unpredictable danger of the routine. One sees it in the overwhelming anxiety and fear building in Bland as she realizes that her failure to bow to the officer’s bewildering commands will cost her more than a traffic ticket. For those who cannot understand Sandra Bland’s shrieks of terror and her attempts to resist miss the point. Ralph Ellison captured it best in his classic novel Invisible Man when the protagonist acknowledges how debilitating it is “to repress not only his emotions but his humanity . . . [to be] invisible, a walking personification of the Negative, . . . the mechanical man!” It is an expression of emotion that competes fruitlessly with the power and privilege of white officers armed with their own fears and a license to use deadly force.

We see it in the frightening rage of McKinney patrolman Eric Casebolt. Americans witnessed his anger in a June video, as he recklessly somersaulted into a crowd of youth, drew his service revolver to chase unarmed teens, and ultimately, trained his fury on 15 year-old Dajerria Becton clad only in a bikini. He slammed her to the grass, kneed her in the back and forced her head to the ground. As one of the partygoers, Tatyana Rhodes, recounted, “He was just aggressive for no reason at all. It was horrible.” Horrible indeed: but far from rare.

Noteworthy books by scholars such as Kali Gross and Cheryl Hicks have powerfully documented the historic injustices faced by Black women in the criminal justice system where white supremacy generally trumped justice for poor and working class Black women. Sandra Bland defies simple classification as either. Neither her college education nor her vibrant smile made her a victim. She was female and she was Black. That, like Raynette Turner, made her invisible.

At the same time, complaints of fatigue have surfaced — in spite of the continued documented cases of police violence against African Americans — over the din of the Black Lives Matter Movement. Yet in the national news, there is growing outrage over a dentist luring and killing a lion on safari. The incident touched so many people that the Empire State Building cast an image of the lion along with other endangered species on its façade, earning criticism from proponents of the Black Lives Matter movement. They are baffled at the lack of compassion for human life. Perhaps if Sandra Bland, Raynette Turner, and the other women who have died were lions, then the majority of Americans could understand why the deafening indifference to their deaths wounds our pride. Not in the racially divisive sense that some will want to read it but in the broader context of our shared humanity. Basic civility should breed, at the very least, empathy. This is the hallmark of invisibility for one cannot feel for what cannot be seen. Those of us who demand it are chastised for being irresponsible or for fanning the flames of racial discord. (Highlights added by OneWorld)

Ellison again masterfully highlighted the conundrum in the prologue, Invisible Man. “I am one of the most irresponsible beings that ever lived. Irresponsibility is part of my invisibility; any way you face it, it is a denial. But to whom can I be responsible, and why should I be, when you refuse to see me?”

We may know her name and we have been introduced to members of her family, but we will never know Sandra Bland or Raynette Turner. We lost that opportunity when they “slipped the surly bounds of earth” while in the control of those supposedly dedicated to serve and protect. In the tragedy of their absence, we are left to contemplate their pain and our own as we attempt to navigate the sea of indifference that threatens to swallow even the shallow memories they leave in their wake. It is an indifference, as a man of color, I understand better now. I have two daughters, one eleven and one thirteen. This past month has been a brutal reminder of the danger they face in the public sphere. We all face the challenge of truly seeing beyond our own entry point the travails of our sisters who make up roughly 13 percent of the female population in the United States, but who remain largely on the margins in the hearts and minds of their fellow citizens — and often in their own communities.

Black Lives Matter. It bears repeating for our wives, mothers and daughters as well as for our sons.

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do on an ongoing basis.

We at OneWorld invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support.  Our mailing address is: OneWorld, Inc.  P. O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531

Read More      No Comments

Wharton School Representatives Say “NO” To Donald Trump

OneWorld Progressive Institute

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.

Donald Trump is a graduate of the Wharton School at University of Pennsylvania.

“You Do Not Represent Us: An Open Letter to Donald Trump.”

OneWorld is a subscriber to Medium.com.  This is an incredibly informative source on a range of  important issues. This letter appeared in Medium on July 11, 2016.  The entire letter is linked below and is pasted here to benefit those who might not be subscribers.

“Dear Mr. Trump:

At the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, students are taught to represent the highest levels of respect and integrity. We are taught to embrace humility and diversity. We can understand why, in seeking America’s highest office, you have used your degree from Wharton to promote and lend legitimacy to your candidacy.

As a candidate for President, and now as the presumptive GOP nominee, you have been afforded a transformative opportunity to be a leader on national and international stages and to make the Wharton community even prouder of our school and values.

However, we have been deeply disappointed in your candidacy.

We, proud students, alumni, and faculty of Wharton, are outraged that an affiliation with our school is being used to legitimize prejudice and intolerance. Although we do not aim to make any political endorsements with this letter, we do express our unequivocal stance against the xenophobia, sexism, racism, and other forms of bigotry that you have actively and implicitly endorsed in your campaign.

The Wharton community is a diverse community. We are immigrants and children of immigrants, people of color, Muslims, Jews, women, people living with or caring for those with disabilities, and members of the LGBTQ community. In other words, we represent the groups that you have repeatedly denigrated, as well as their steadfast friends, family, and allies.

“We recognize that we are fortunate to be educated at Wharton, and we are committed to using our opportunity to make America and the world a better place — for everyone. We are dedicated to promoting inclusion not only because diversity and tolerance have been repeatedly proven to be valuable assets to any organization’s performance, but also because we believe in mutual respect and human dignity as deeply held values. Your insistence on exclusion and scapegoating would be bad for business and bad for the American economy. An intolerant America is a less productive, less innovative, and less competitive America.

“We, the undersigned Wharton students, alumni, and faculty, unequivocally reject the use of your education at Wharton as a platform for promoting prejudice and intolerance. Your discriminatory statements are incompatible with the values that we are taught and we teach at Wharton, and we express our unwavering commitment to an open and inclusive American society.”

https://medium.com/@whartonopenletter/you-do-not-represent-us-an-open-letter-to-donald-trump-94cf73ce11d8#.uwsyiwjqv

CLICK HERE TO ADD YOUR NAME TO THIS OPEN LETTER.

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do on an ongoing basis.

We at OneWorld invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support.

Below are a few samples of our community contributions:  https://youtu.be/9X9cRzwOK3M Looking for a Face Like Mine

https://youtu.be/VHIg4SY4V14   OneWorld’s Middle School Oratory Competition

https://youtu.be/TCJ-gcGY0L4 Learning about Gynecologic Cancers in the TV studio.  women from the community joined N’Zinga Shäni and doctors from Yale to address health education issues. Visit our YouTube channel to see many more videos. Please share us with your friends.

Read More      No Comments