America Needs National Facilitated Discussions About Race

These facilitated discussions about Race In America need to be held in every state, in every region, and in all major towns and cities. A major question is – will there be meaningful numbers of participants from all ethnic/racial groups?  In many areas there will be; and in many areas the reaction to this suggestion will be the equivalent of World War 3.  The fact is — as a country — we could and would derive real benefits. There are enough committed people in this country to make this happen in many geographic areas.  Of course, it will work best if there is positive media coverage.

Most white Americans do not want to talk about race.  Many black Americans are tired of dealing with race; they do not see where talking about it makes any real difference.  Many black and brown people have experienced the sting of racism; some continue to experience it daily. Some of our young people are aware of the psychological damage that centuries of racism has done to their psyche.  In a teen forum done by OneWorld Progressive Institute in 2014, some teens talked about the pain of colorism brought about by racism, and how proximity to whiteness affects the self esteem of children even within families.  The costs of inequality in America manifest on every level of our society: from the nuclear family to the corporate boardroom and  legislative offices.

Civic Engagement: Paper Bag Principle Student Forum https://youtu.be/8r1OK5Comt8

Please watch the video interview.

Here the author of the book titled: The Paper Bag Principle: class, colorism & rumor and the case of Black Washington, D.C: Audrey Elisa Kerr, PhD is interviewed by a OneWorld board member, Enola Aird, about the effects of the Paper Bag Principle on the black community.  The interview is in depth and offers viewers deep layers of background information.  Dr. Kerr and Ms. Aird are very forthcoming about the significant psychological issues  involved in the effects of the Paper Bag Principle.  The discussion with the students (linked above) highlights very vividly some of those effects.  Listen carefully to what the students have to say and who is saying what.  The costs of inequality, and the costs of racism and colorism in American society have been high indeed. Unfortunately, as a society,  we have not been very willing to acknowledge these costs and we continue to incur them. Such recognition would be one benefit of national discussions.

Those costs are also reflected in how some black people comport themselves in dealing with police, with white people in general, and with white people in positions of authority and power.   The manner in which most black people are perceived– and black men in particular specifically by police, teachers, and by many people in power– is a direct result of inculcated racism.

For decades black people have been killed by police and by racists; the only difference now is that– because of technology– we are hearing about many (not all) of these callous, racially motivated killings.  Young black men have been the most common targets, but there have also been many young black women who have been murdered by police and by racists. Quite often, the regular media did not include such deaths in their news casts. Prior to the election of President Obama, regular black people were (quite often) not given equal status as human beings by many segments of our regular media.  As shocking as this might seem, it is a fact.  Browse back 20 years at some news reports about the deaths of some black people.  How many of these people had you heard of? The pictures below do not include those murdered/killed since Dec. 2014, nor those killed before 1999.  It does not include a picture of 10 year-old Clifford Glover, shot in the back by officer Shea on April 28, 1973.  Glover and his father were running away from the officer.  Of course, as always, Shea claimed the 10-year-old had a gun; that was a bold-face lie. Other officers tried to find a gun they could attribute to the little boy.  Thankfully, in this case, the community stood up, so the media was forced to cover it.

“A Police Shot to a Boy’s Back in Queens, Echoing Since 1973.” 

(NY Times, April 4, 2015)

“It was 1973, long before anyone could imagine hashtag declarations of solidarity and protest, the kind of message to the world that today might read, #IamCliffordGloverInTheFourthGrade.

“No one could pull out a phone to make a video of Clifford Glover, a 10-year-old running from a plainclothes police officer with a gun who had just jumped out of a white Buick Skylark in Jamaica, Queens, on a spring morning in 1973.

“I am sure a camera would have helped, but the ballistics were clear,” Albert Gaudelli, a former Queens prosecutor, said this week. “The bullet entered his lower back and came out at the top of his chest. He was shot T-square in the back, with his body leaning forward. He was running away.”  Please read about Clifford Glover’s murder here.  The officer was not indicted, but was fired. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/17/nyregion/fired-at-queens-boy-fatal-1973-police-shot-still-reverberates.html

The New York Times has been one mainstream media that has consistently written about murders of black by police.  It should also be noted that the NY Times has employed diverse reporters and writers.  In 1996 Bob Herbert wrote a scathing piece about the “Sickness In the N.Y.P.D.” By BOB HERBERT, Published: October 11, 1996.  In this piece Herbert delineated the killings of several African Americans and Hispanics by New York police officers.  In most cases, the officers walked free. http://www.nytimes.com/1996/10/11/opinion/sickness-in-the-nypd.html

Have you heard of the death of  Rumain Brisbon, 34, Phoenix, Ariz.—Dec. 2, 2014.  This egregious case certainly has not made the news on our side of the USA.  Why is that?

Unarmed People of Color Killed by Police, 1999-2014

Brisbon, an unarmed black father of four, was shot to death when a police officer apparently mistook his bottle of pills for a gun. Aftermath: Pending. (Why is it that the Police always claim that black men and boys have guns?!)

Unarmed People of Color Killed by Police, 1999-2014

Unarmed People of Color Killed by Police, 1999-2014

http://gawker.com/unarmed-people-of-color-killed-by-police-1999-2014-1666672349

This week (July 20 – 27, 2015) the New York Times has several articles about Race in America.  We link some below and invite you to visit and read them:

Poll Finds Most in U.S. Hold Dim View of Race Relations

Seven years ago, in the gauzy afterglow of a stirring election night in Chicago, commentators dared ask whether the United States had finally begun to heal its divisions over race and atone for the original sin of slavery by electing its first black president. It has not. Not even close.

A New York Times/CBS News poll conducted last week reveals that nearly six in 10 Americans, including heavy majorities of both whites and blacks, think race relations are generally bad, and that nearly four in 10 think the situation is getting worse. By comparison, two-thirds of Americans surveyed shortly after President Obama took office said they believed that race relations were generally good.

Mourners at Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, S.C., in June after nine people were killed there. The killings generated a national outpouring of outrage and grief. Credit Travis Dove for The New York Times

A Growing Divide on Race: How views on race differ among black and white Americans.

OPEN Graphic

New York Times/CBS News Poll on Race Relations in the U.S.

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Heart Health: New Medical Mysteries & Patient Education

When it comes to the human heart, timing is everything.  In this 21st Century, many people can and do survive even severe heart attacks.  Much depends on recognizing symptoms and being able to get the right kind of help immediately.  Timing is critical.  Do you know the signs and symptoms of a heart attack?  Do you think you are too young to have a heart attack?  Too slim? Think again.  Do you live in a home with a smoker? During holidays and time off from work are you a recreational heavy consumer of alcohol? Do you like to let your hair down and drink until you pass out? These are a few of the questions you should consider in evaluating your cardiac risks.

Medical Mysteries of the Heart – NY Times,  

 

Scientists have made enormous gains in reducing deaths from coronary heart disease, the leading cause of heart attacks, but it is astonishing how much they still don’t know. That leaves patients and their doctors uncertain about the best way to fight a disease that is still the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States.

The successes and remaining puzzles in treating heart disease were laid out in recent articles by The Times’s Gina Kolata. From 2003 to 2013, the death rate from coronary heart disease plunged by about 38 percent, thanks to better control of cholesterol and blood pressure, a decline in smoking rates, improved medical treatments and faster care of people after a heart attack.

The most surprising gaps in knowledge involve two of the most common treatments: when to use stents — small wire cages — to prop open coronary arteries and how far to drive down blood pressure.  (Color and bold emphasis added by OneWorld)

Stents save the lives of people having heart attacks, but there is no convincing evidence that they prevent heart attacks in people suffering chest pain because of a partially blocked coronary artery. The cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins, under some theories, might do as much to reduce pain. Unfortunately, belief in stents is so ingrained among cardiologists and patients that it has been difficult to recruit enough people for a study comparing the treatments.

Researchers also need to find out more about just how low blood pressure needs to be to prevent heart attacks, strokes and other ill effects. A clinical study of 9,000 adults with high blood pressure being conducted now might offer some answers when results are in, probably in 2017. Half of the participants were told to reduce their systolic blood pressure — the top number — to below 120 by using common medications, while the other half aimed for below 140. The importance of diet and exercise and of risk factors like family history in determining optimal blood pressure for an individual still needs more research.

Some recent studies have found new practices that make a significant difference to the outcome for heart attack patients. In a multiyear analysis, Yale researchers found that some hospitals reduced the time between when a patient suffered a heart attack and had a clogged artery opened by changing emergency room procedures.

 Without relying on new technology, they altered protocols, like having paramedics transmit an electrocardiogram to the emergency room; having emergency room doctors rather than a cardiologist decide whether a patient was having a heart attack; and summoning all members of a heart attack team with a single phone call. These common-sense ideas reduced the time before treatment to less than an hour for most patients from two hours or more.

Improvements in surgical techniques are also saving lives in cases that would not have been possible before. This has been true with one procedure that has become a preferred treatment for patients suffering from severe aortic valve stenosis, an often fatal condition involving the narrowing of a valve controlling blood flow from the heart. Some 100,000 Americans have this condition but are too old or sick for open-heart surgery to replace the valve. Now, many such patients are being saved by threading a catheter through a blood vessel and using it to insert a new valve, made of cow or pig tissue, without removing the old one. Some experts believe this will become the standard treatment for most patients with the disease, not just those who are frail.

Further gains in heart treatment may come from breakthrough medicines that are being tested. A panel of experts recommended last month that the Food and Drug Administration approve two drugs that reduce so-called bad cholesterol to remarkably low levels for patients in whom statins don’t work well. The recommendations were based on highly encouraging preliminary data, with large clinical trials ending in 2017. Making sure that there are no unexpected risks in lowering cholesterol to such levels will require more hard data.

In this and other cases, more data can help doctors and patients overcome ingrained resistance to new medical approaches.   http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/04/opinion/medical-mysteries-of-the-heart.html?

  •  OneWorld  suggests you also read the June article titled: Mending Hearts.  As the Times Editorial points out:  “Stents save the lives of people having heart attacks, but there is no convincing evidence that they prevent heart attacks in people suffering chest pain because of a partially blocked coronary artery.” Therefore, it makes sense that when it comes to our heart health prevention is our best strategy. We need to learn as much as we can and practice prevention.
  • As individuals, the best we can do is to try to eat healthy, fresh foods with lots of vegetables; consult a nutritionist if you are not versed on what is a healthy diet.
  •  Drink plenty of fresh, clean water; get regular exercise; do not smoke; avoid inhaling second-hand smoke.
  • Try to maintain a healthy weight; speak to your doctor about what is a healthy
    weight for you.  Below are a few additional resources for heart healthy eating.
  • Watch OneWorld Health videos at:  https://www.youtube.com/user/oneworldpi/videos

A Sea Change in Treating Heart Attacks

The death rate from coronary heart disease has dropped 38 percent in a decade. One reason is that hospitals rich and poor have streamlined emergency treatment.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/21/health/saving-heart-attack-victims-stat.html?

OneWorld OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc., is a small group of committed volunteers who produce community information and education television programs on health literacy, education and civic engagement.  We also find good information and post informative blogs about issues we believe shine light and are beneficial to many in our communities.  Learn more about us at our web site: www.oneworldpi.org/  and visit our web health section at: http://www.oneworldpi.org/health/index.html  Please share our information with others.  Watch our informative television programs on your public access channels: Frontier (formerly AT&T), Channel 99, drop down; Charter Communications Chan. 21, and Comcast (Xfinity) Channels 10, 15, 18 & 26  (Hamden, New Haven & West Haven, Mondays at 8-9pm; Sat. at 9pm).

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Misty Copeland: America’s First Black Principal Ballerina

Misty Copeland is now the Principal Ballerina for the American Ballet Theatre) ABT).  In the 75 year history of the ABT it is the first time that a black person has been selected as the principal ballerina. Ms. Copeland is delighted.  She says since she was 13 years old her dream was to be a principal ballerina.   Clearly, she has earned the honor.   On June 30, 2015, the American Ballet Theatre, one of the three top classical ballet companies announced that she was now its Principal Ballerina. The dream has been realized and conferred.   Misty can soar like an eagle; she can perch like a cat;  she floats through the air with grace and beauty.   Whatever she does, she does with grace, elegance, glamour and style.  Learn much more about her at her official site: http://www.mistycopeland.com/home.html  Here CNN makes the official announcement: http://www.cnn.com/2015/06/30/living/feat-misty-copeland-dancer-abt/ 

Misty started dancing late for the ballet culture.  She grew up in less than affluent circumstances; she did not have many ballerinas of colour to inspire her, and by ballerina standards she was not the ideal.  Being 5′ 2″ she had her doubts about her future in classical Ballet.  Most ballerinas are taller, but Misty had passion, commitment, desire and determination.  All these have paid off; she has arrived at the pinacle of the Ballerina World.  As a soloist for the past eight years she has been admired around the world; she has been treated like a rock star (especially when she travels).   Characteristically, here is what she said as a soloist:  “My fears are that it could be another two decades before another black woman is in the position that I hold with an elite ballet company,” she wrote in her memoir, “Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina,” published in 2014. “That if I don’t rise to principal, people will feel I have failed them.”  No one can ever feel that now Misty.   You are an inspiration to many little girls and boys of color. For our readers below are various images of Ms. Copeland performing or just being photographed. She certainly is telegenic. Misty Copeland Made the Cover of Time Magazine, April 16, 2015.   She was chosen as one of the magizine’s “100 most influential people.”                                                                                         

  

                                                                                           

 Photo: Henry Leutwyler

This picture of Misty Copeland highlights all her defined muscles, and is truly motivation to hit the gym.

 
Misty Copeland on June 30, 2015
Image result for images of Misty Copeland

Misty Copeland in American Ballet Theatre’s Swan Lake

 

         Image result for images of Misty Copeland 

 

Misty Copeland (below) as a soloist in “Le Corsaire” with the American Ballet Theatre.

Misty Copeland as a soloist in “Le Corsaire” with the American Ballet Theatre.

She SOARS Elegantly, Gracefully, and seems to do so effortlessly. This is Misty Copeland at her most beautiful

Below are images of Misty Copeland at various stages of her development before and with the American Ballet Theatre. She started dancing at the mature age of 13 for the world of ballerinas.

  Image result for images of Misty Copeland   Image result for images of Misty Copeland    Image result for images of Misty CopelandImage result for images of Misty Copeland   Image result for images of Misty Copeland    Image result for images of Misty Copeland

The epitome of gorgeous, talented, brilliant womanhood.  

 Story by Bill Whitaker, CBS News, June 30, 2015, 7:26 PM

 

​ Misty Copeland, a tour de force, breaks ballet barrier

 NEW YORK – A promotion made public Tuesday has launched Misty Copeland into ballet history. The 32-year-old was named the American Ballet Theater’s principal dancer, making her the first African-American female to hold that position in the company’s 75-year history.

“I had moments of doubting myself and wanting to quit because I didn’t know if there would be a future for an African-American woman to make it to this level,” said Copeland Tuesday.

“At the same time it made me so hungry to push through to carry the next generation so it’s not me up here and I’m constantly saying that it’s everyone that came before me that got me to this position and all the little girls who can see themselves through me it’s giving them a brighter future.”   “Something happens when you feel that energy and excitement from the audience,” Copeland told “60 Minutes.” “You jump higher than you ever have and it’s just this really magical thing that happens in those moments.”

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/misty-copeland-a-tour-de-force-breaks-ballet-barrier/

Misty Copeland Is Officially The First Black Female Principal Dancer In American Ballet Theatre History. By , June 30, 2015

History was made in the ballet world this week when soloist Misty Copeland was promoted to principal dancer, thereby becoming the first black female principal in the 75-year history of the American Ballet Theatre.

Copeland, now 32 years old, has been dancing with the American Ballet Theatre for over 14 years, nearly eight as a soloist. Most recently, she starred as Odette/Odile in “Swan Lake” at the Met, a role dance critic Alastair Macaulay called “the most epic role in world ballet.

“Two aspects of [Misty’s] performance … proved marvelous,” Macaulay wrote in his review. “One: that it all happened successfully. Two: the curtain calls.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/06/30/misty-copeland-principal-dancer_n_7697872.html

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc., is a small group of committed volunteers who produce community information and education television programs on health literacy, education and civic engagement.  We also find good information and post informative blogs about issues we believe shine light and are beneficial to many in our communities. 

This blog about Misty Copeland is intended to inspire our young and not so young people who do not believe they can achieve great things.  They certainly can.  Misty Copeland achieved because she had a vision, a desire, the determination and she worked very hard.  Today she has achieved something that has not been done by many in this America.  Congratulations Ms. Copeland; you believed and you achieved.

 Learn more about us at our web site: www.oneworldpi.org/  and visit our Civic & Community Engagement efforts at: http://www.oneworldpi.org/civic_engagement/index.html We are about Community Involvement & Public Good and we work to make Positive contributions to our community.  We also sponor a middle school oratory competition and various education forums for young people.

OneWorld’s YouTube is here: http://goo.gl/jkPaiQ And Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB

Please share our information with others.  Watch our informative television programs on your public access channels: Frontier (formerly AT&T), Channel 99, drop down; Charter Communications Chan. 21, and Comcast (Xfinity) Channels 10, 15, 18 & 26. In Hamden, New Haven and West Haven find us Mondays at 8pm on Comcast, Xfinity, Channel 26. Please “like” OneWorld on Face Book.

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Supreme Court Rules 5-4 for Same-Sex Marriage Equity

CIVIC & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT: June 26, 2015
Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro (Connecticut) is clearly in her element in this picture

With this Supreme Court 5-4 ruling in support of Same-Sex Marriage Equity, America has taken a giant step towards fairness today. Let’s reflect on what that really means. While we are unlikely to ever get to 9 – 0, we are moving in a positive direction.

IF ENDING RACISM & BIGOTRY COULD ONLY BE AS CLEAR-CUT AS THIS 5-4 RULING. Unfortunately, we have a long way to go yet, but let’s keep working and being honest about the challenges ahead. (N’Zinga Shäni, OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc)

Gay Marriage Backers Win Supreme Court Victory

Mandagere, left, and Natalie Thompson outside the Supreme Court following the 5-4 ruling by the court Friday. Credit Doug Mills/The New York Times

WASHINGTON — In a long-sought victory for the gay rights movement, the Supreme Court ruled on Friday that the Constitution guarantees a right to same-sex marriage.

Justice Anthony M. Kennedy wrote the majority opinion in the 5 to 4 decision. He was joined by the court’s four more liberal justices.

The decision, the culmination of decades of litigation and activism, came against the backdrop of fast-moving changes in public opinion, with polls indicating that most Americans now approve of same-sex marriage.

Justice Kennedy said gay and lesbian couples had a fundamental right to marry.

“No union is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice, and family,” he wrote. “In forming a marital union, two people become something greater than once they were.” 

Sadly, when it comes to racism and its devastating effects on the lives of millions, it is impossible for many black Americans to realize their potential, or to even become real couples (as black people together). The practice of racism and bigotry takes a grave toll on the psyche and on the ability to be all that we can be. (N. S. Shäni)

Read the complete story in the NY Times here: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/27/us/supreme-court-same-sex-marriage.html?  Peace all.

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc., is a small group of committed volunteers who produce community information and education television programs on health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also find good information and post informative blogs about issues we believe shine light and are beneficial to many in our communities.
Learn more about us at our web site: www.oneworldpi.org/  and visit our Civic & Community Engagement section at: http://www.oneworldpi.org/civic_engagement/index.html

At OneWorld we are about Community Involvement & Public Good, and we work to make Positive contributions to our community. We produce and broadcast (on public access channels) television programs and community forums that inform the entire CT community.  We focus on Health Literacy (“21st Century Conversations); Education Agenda and Civic Engagement. We have been doing this since June 1996.  We ask for your support.
OneWorld’s YouTube is here: http://goo.gl/jkPaiQ  And Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB
Please share our information with others. Watch our informative television programs on your public access channels: Frontier (formerly AT&T), Channel 99, drop down; Charter Communications Chan. 21, and Comcast (Xfinity) Channels 10, 15, 18 & 26. In Hamden, New Haven and West Haven find us Mondays at 8pm on Comcast, Xfinity, Channel 26. Please “like” us on Face Book.  Please visit our YouTube channel to see examples of our work:   http://goo.gl/jkPaiQ

You can make a donation through PayPal, or you may send us a check made payable to: OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc.   Mail it to: OneWorld, Inc. P. O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531.  Your donation is tax deductible. 

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Marva Collins: Activist, Educator, She Inspired Learners

Marva CollinsMarva Collins, Activist Educator, 1936 to June 25, 2015.  Her methods of engaging students, and her ability to inspire, and to instill in students a love of learning and of critical-thinking, will live on in those she taught.  I was inspired by Marva Collins in the mid-1980s.  Mrs. Collins passed away today, June 25, 2015.  She was 78.  Mrs. Collins gave her students and the teachers she trained her all. She was the consummate educator; she believed in her students.

Mrs. Collins cashed in her teacher’s pension and started her Westside Pre-K-8 School in 1975.  After being praised and recognized for the extraordinary success she had teaching black children from poor neighborhoods, some of these children were not thought to be educable, she started getting accolades.  President Reagan reportedly courted her to be Secretary of Education. 

Mrs. Collins wanted to be in the classroom where she could see the difference she was making.  She wanted to be in the classroom teaching children who were considered too difficult to teach. These children were from challenging environments.  Marva Collins believed it was important to instill a love of learning and an ability to think critically, through classic literature, in all students.

  • At one time there were two schools. Mrs. Collins also taught thousands of teachers annually. 
  • In 1981 Cicely Tyson played Mrs. Collins in the Marva Collins Story, a made for TV movie.
  • Marva Collins former students have become doctors, lawyers and educators.
  • Most were students  who many believed were not capable of learning or of succeeding academically.  She sought out students from disadvantaged homes.
  • Marva Collins believed in them; she taught them to love learning; to love good literature and to think critically.
  • Mrs. Collins became a sought-after speaker. She invested much of what she earned from speaking engagements into her schools so that the tuition would remain affordable to children from poor families.
  • She wrote several books: The Marva Collins Way (written with Alex Haley);

Ordinary Children, Extraordinary Teachers    Values: Lighting the Candle of Excellence : A Practical Guide for the Family      Marva Collins' Way
Ordinary Children, Extraordinary Teachers, and Values: Lighting the Candle of Excellence: A Practical Guide for the Family

Mrs. Collins was also celebrated with several awards, and was the recipient of the Jefferson Award; the Humanitarian Award for Excellence; as well as honorary doctorates from institutions like Amherst, Dartmouth and Notre Dame. In 2004, President Bush honored her with the National Humanities Medal.

There are private schools using her method of teaching and cultivating scholars today.

After dwindling financial support and low enrollment, Mrs. Collins closed both schools in 2008. She was disappointed and saddened, but had no choice. At the time she said she wished that the community had been more supportive.  She seemed resigned to the fact that she had no choice but to close her schools; enrollment had dwindled to about 30 students. Biography says: Marva Collins is a pioneering school founder and education activist whose methods have transformed the lives of thousands of students.” What Mrs. Collins did will have an impact for generations to come and will continue to make a positive difference well into the future.   We hope that the teachers and students that she taught will go on to teaching and inspiring others.

OneWorld salutes the contributions made by Mrs. Marva Collins, educator extraordinaire.   Learn more about this phenomenal educator at the links below: http://www.biography.com/people/marva-collins-5894#background  http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-marva-collins-obituary-met-20150625-story.html 

 Marva Collins Biography – Influenced by father

Collins was born Marva Delores Nettles on August 31, 1936, in Monroeville, Alabama. She has described her childhood as “wonderful” and filled with material comforts that included riding in luxury cars and having her own horse. Her father, Alex Nettles, owned a general store and later purchased a ranch and a funeral home. He was very attentive and supportive to Marva and her younger sister, Cynthia. By challenging Marva to use her mind, he gave her a strong sense of pride and self-esteem. Read more: http://www.notablebiographies.com/Co-Da/Collins-Marva.html#ixzz3e8r72bfv
http://www.notablebiographies.com/Co-Da/Collins-Marva.html

The Marva Collins Quest: Replicating Successful High Poverty Schools  Posted by & filed under CGR Staff, Rochester Business Journal. http://blog.cgr.org/kent-gardner/the-marva-collins-quest-replicating-successful-high-poverty-schools/

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc., is a small group of committed volunteers who produce community information and education television programs on health literacy, education and civic engagement.  We also find good information and post informative blogs about issues we believe shine light and are beneficial to many in our communities.  Learn more about us at our web site: www.oneworldpi.org/  and visit our web education section at: http://www.oneworldpi.org/education/index.html

Please share our information with others.  Watch our informative television programs on your public access channels: Frontier (formerly AT&T), Channel 99, drop down; Charter Communications Chan. 21, and Comcast (Optimum) Channels 10, 15, 18 & 26. 

OneWorld’s YouTube is here: http://goo.gl/jkPaiQ And Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  Please share our information with others. 

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