An Open Letter to Black America: Racism IS America’s Cancer

OneWorld Progressive Institute

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996. Please visit our YouTube channel to see examples of our work: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6  Education and Civic Engagement are two areas of focus. Visitors can learn much more about OneWorld’s investment in education by visiting: http://www.oneworldpi.org/education/  See Civic Engagement here: http://www.oneworldpi.org/civic_engagement/  OneWorld is also committed to Health Literacy.  Learn more here: http://www.oneworldpi.org/health/

In conducting research to write a blog about the most recent “Birther deceptious act” pulled off by the Republican candidate on Friday, Sept. 16, 2016 I came across an interesting letter written and published on February 18, 2016 by    Mr. Schaeffer describes himself as an Atheist who believes in God.  That in and of itself made me curious.  However, I have heard of Mr. Schaeffer before; he is a blogger for the Huffington Post.  He is also the son of evangelical theologian Francis Schaeffer (1912-1984), and Edith Rachel Merritt Schaeffer  (November 3, 1914 – March 30, 2013). She was a prominent Christian author and co-founder of L’Abri, a Christian organization community that welcomed people who were seeking intellectually honest and culturally informed answers to questions about God and the meaning of life. Frank’s  parents are referred to as evangelical royalty.  His mother was born in China and died is Switzerland; she was also the child of missionaries.

I find his letter  quite interesting and I think readers will also find it so. I did a little exploration.  Frank Schaeffer has a fascinating background. I hope you will read his ‘Open Letter to Black Americans’ carefully and thoroughly.  Lastly, please SHARE it with others. Here is the essential message from Mr. Schaeffer:  Black American’s justified anger must become action during this election.  African-Americans have to say “ENOUGH!” in 2016 and VOTE to send every Republican senator, Congressperson, governor and presidential candidate out into a long cold night of oblivion that awaits racists everywhere.”

You may also find some of the blogs on the Progressive Christian Channel to be of interest: http://www.patheos.com/Progressive-Christian  We are neither endorsing nor promoting the information provided; it is another source of information we do not get in the regular media.  Truth is, some of the most significant information in America today is not found or presented to us through the mainstream media.  In fact, there are times when we must wonder — exactly what is the role of the regular media?  Matt Lauer’s interviews with the two leading political candidates, during what was supposed to have been the “Commander-In-Chief” interviews, was one such time.    Matt Lauer’s conduct as a journalist was reprehensible.  In the letter below, the blue highlights and bold were inserted by OneWorld for emphasis.  We have not changed any content.

An Open Letter to Black Americans From This White Former Republican Religious Right Enemy: When it Comes to the Nomination of a New Supreme Court Justice, President Obama is Being Disrespected Because He’s Black. Period! February 18, 2016 by Frank Schaeffer

“Dear Black America:

“I am a white privileged well off sixty-three-year-old former Republican religious right wing activist who changed his mind about religion and politics long ago.  In view of what the Republicans have become in 2016 and how they have disrespected President Obama for 7 years, I’m glad I fled that party. The New York Times noted that because I left the right wing my former friends call me a traitor. These days in view of the naked racism of the Republicans I’m proud to be called that.

When a black woman or man shouts “racism” some white Americans pretend that we are past race issues and that a black person accusing whites of being racists is just looking for excuses. So please let this white man in the age demographic usually associated with right wing Republicans say it too: The Republicans’ disrespect of President Obama is now and has always been about race!

“The Republicans in the Senate and their treatment of the President over his right to nominate a judge to the Supreme Court, reminds me of  the 18th century “law” that counted a black man as the equivalent to “three-fifths of a person.”

“Now Obama is being given three fifths of his rights as a president.

Today my former Republican friends have a front-runner Donald Trump who has disrespected the President and all people of color. Trump has even disrespected Mexicans and other immigrants as “rapists.”

Trump has called the brown people seeking refuge in our country “rapists.” Does that ring a bell? What was the “reason” so many innocent black men were lynched? They too were called rapists.

Now the Republicans are denying his legitimacy again.

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz said he will “absolutely” block anyone President Obama names to the Supreme Court, no matter who the nominee is.

“Cruz said the white-controlled Senate does “not remotely” have an obligation to at least consider a nominee. “You know what?” Cruz said, “the Senate is advising right now. We’re advising that a lame-duck President in an election year is not going to be able to tip the balance of the Supreme Court,” he said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.

The time has come for the black community to rise up and punish the Republicans in 2016 in a way that will send them back to the stone age where people with racist views belong.

The Republicans have been disrespecting President Obama since Day One. 

 It is all about the color of his skin, that’s all, the color of his skin. And any white man or woman who says otherwise is lying. Period.

America doesn’t want to admit this truth for the same reason as people deny the truth when they are told they have terminal cancer. Racism is the American cancer.

“Yet the truth is clear: When Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky said after Scalia’s death that the next  president, rather than President Obama, should select a successor, the senator’s coded racist words were clear to anyone except whites living in denial.

Black America knows better. After years of watching white Republicans “question” the president’s birthplace and his faith, and hearing a member of Congress shout “You lie!”African-Americans have to say “ENOUGH!” in 2016 and VOTE to send every Republican senator, Congressperson, governor and presidential candidate out into a long cold night of oblivion that awaits racists everywhere.

Senate Republicans are launching an attempt to deny the legitimacy of our country’s first black president–again. Our president is the president of the United States, and he has been disrespected at every turn.

Black American’s justified anger must become action during this election.

Americans who love our country have to send this message: We black, white and brown people who love America won’t tolerate the next round of Republican disrespect of our first black president. We won’t let these bigots spoil his legacy.

We will defend the Obama legacy by sending a Democrat to the White House. And we will send Democrats to Congress too so that they may confirm justices who will defend civil rights.

As Hillary Clinton puts it:

“Now the Republicans say they’ll reject anyone President Obama nominates no matter how qualified,” Mrs. Clinton said  “Some are even saying he doesn’t have the right to nominate anyone! As if somehow he’s not the real president.” Mrs. Clinton added: “They demonize President Obama and encourage the ugliest impulses of the paranoid fringe,” she said. “This kind of hatred and bigotry has no place in our politics or our country.”

We have a lot to do to heal this country of the damage done by the white Obama-haters. Send this message to the Republicans by VOTING: “Get rid of your racist haters or go the way of the dinosaurs in 2016!”

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/frankschaeffer/2016/02/an-open-letter-to-black-americans-from-this-white-former-republican-religious-right-enemy-when-it-comes-to-the-nomination-of-a-new-supreme-court-justice-president-obama-is-being-disrespected-because/

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do at any given time and on an ongoing basis.  We invite and appreciate technical and financial support.

We at OneWorld invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support. Write to us at: OneWorld, Inc. P.O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531

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Another Landmark Court Decision About CT Public Schools

OneWorld Progressive Institute

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3,  100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  Please visit our YouTube channel to see examples of our work: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Education and Civic Engagement are two areas of focus.  Visitors can learn much more about OneWorld’s investment in education by visiting: http://www.oneworldpi.org/education/

September 7, 2016 should go down in the anals of Connecticut Public Education history as being close to the significance of the ruling on Brown Versus the Board of Education, or the decision in Sheff V. O’Neil.  However,  those who have lived through those rulings  are painfully aware that these rulings are more easily issued than they are adherred to.  We sincerely hope that this time will be the exception, and that those who control the purse strings will not be as successful in beating the system as have happened in the past.  We also hope that parents and advocates will be more involved — on a consistent basis — and be more balanced and truly informed in dealing with the political, legislative, and social and mental infrastructures of racism that exist in ConnecticutWe hope that discipline and rigorous academic standards will again be the norm in all public schools.

Teachers should be able to teach and not have to spend 50 percent of their time on trying to create a learning environment because too many children are behaviorally out of conrol.  Teachers should not have to tolerate abuse and blatant disrespect from students.  It is impossible to teach children who will not pay attention, or who are so hyperactive they cannot sit still.

Parents need to do their jobs in teaching discipline, respect and cooperative behaviors at home, so their children know how to conduct themselves in the classroom. There needs to be more team-building between the home and the school. Sadly, some children have a roof over their heads but no guidance, support, love or direction at what passes for home.  Successfully addressing these issues pose enormous challenges; however, if our education system is to succeed in adequately preparing the majority of our students, we must succeed in creating a positive learning environment in all schools.  Cooperative teamwork between parents and teachers is central to that success.  Here are a few examples from programs produced by OneWorld:  Parents & Teachers, Working Together, Help Students’ Succeed” https://youtu.be/b_vjtSflhe0  School districts in several other states (none in CT) have requested DVD copies of this program.  The complete program is on our YouTube channel. The next program is an 11-mins TED talk.

Building Relationships Between Parents and Teachers:  https://youtu.be/kin2OdchKMQ TED  In this TED talk Megan Olivia Hall talks about the relationship between resources, opportunities and academic success.  Connections bridge the academic gap.

In 2016, NHPS principals talk about “Building Success Pathways for ALL Students” https://youtu.be/nXeZgf7VXNk   In all of our urban districts there are students who are succeeding academically.  Granted, many are failing.  The question then has to be – why are some children (sitting in the same classes with the same teachers) succeeding while others are not?  Clearly, it is not that they are not being taught; it might be that some children do not arrive at school prepared to learn.  It might also be that some teachers have given up because the challenges they face in some of our urban classrooms are too debilitating.  

How do we fix all of these problems?  And fix them we must.  America’s future depends on it.

  • Some of the comments in the first video linked above address this very issue.
  • Identifying those students and arranging special classrooms for them might be an answer.  However, the fix might be far more complex and need more input and joint efforts by parents.  
  • Without an enormous amount of financial commitment by the state, far more education resource from a variety of sources, and effective partnerships with parents, the urban school districts will not accomplish the order issued by the Judge Moukawsher today.

Court Orders Far-Reaching Reforms for CT Public Schools

Declaring that “Connecticut is defaulting on its constitutional duty” to fairly educate its poorest children, a Superior Court judge on Wednesday ordered the state to come up with a new funding formula for public schools.

Judge Thomas Moukawsher’s unexpectedly far-reaching decision also directed the state to devise clear standards for both the elementary and high school levels, including developing a graduation test. He also ordered a complete overhaul of Connecticut’s system of evaluating teachers, principals and superintendents. And he demanded a change in the “irrational” way the state funds special education services.

Moukawsher’s mandates come with a tight deadline: The remedies he is ordering must be submitted to the court within 180 days. It is unclear how the state Department of Education, the legislature and Gov. Dannel P. Malloy will come up with solutions, within six months, to complicated problems that have plagued public education in Connecticut for decades.

“Nothing here was done lightly or blindly,” Moukawsher said, reading his entire 90-page decision from the bench, a highly unusual undertaking that took close to three hours. “The court knows what its ruling means for many deeply ingrained practices, but it also has a marrow-deep understanding that if they are to succeed where they are most strained, schools have to be about teaching children and nothing else.”

The much-anticipated decision is the culmination of an 11-year legal battle between the state and the Connecticut Coalition for Justice in Education Funding, an alliance of municipalities, boards of education, teachers’ unions and education advocacy groups. The coalition filed a lawsuit against then-Gov. M. Jodi Rell, alleging that the state’s education cost-sharing formula violates the state constitution and places an unfair burden on local property taxes to support school spending.

State Faces Big Task Complying With Judge's Ruling A spokesman for Attorney General George Jepsen, whose office defended the state in the case, declined to say whether the office intends to appeal the ruling.

“We are reviewing this decision in consultation with our client agencies and decline to comment further at this time,” spokesman Samuel Carmody said.

Moukawsher did not stipulate what the state’s level of funding for public schools should be, but he declared that the current system is failing Connecticut’s students. 

“So change must come. The state has to accept that the schools are its blessing and its burden, and if it cannot be wise, it must at least be sensible,” Moukawsher said.

Members of the coalition praised the judge’s ruling. “This is a landmark victory for Connecticut’s public school students,” said the group’s president, Newtown Selectman Herb Rosenthal. “The court’s decision will have a significant impact on education funding and opportunities in Connecticut.”

Municipal leaders also praised the breadth and scope of Moukawsher’s decision. A stunned Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton, who sat in the wood-paneled courtroom as the ruling was read, called it “a sweeping indictment of the education system in Connecticut. … He left no stone unturned.”

Read The Decision In CCJEF v. Rell

Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim, who was also in court, called the decision “a huge game changer … I think it compels action.”

New Britain Mayor Erin Stewart said the ruling means “the state can no longer ignore its poorest cities and lowest-performing education systems. The biggest piece is the achievement gap: In Connecticut you have the poorest of the poor and the richest of the rich.”

And Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin said the ruling “shines a bright light on the profound inequalities that exist between school districts and holds out the promise of real reform to our educational system and funding structure.”

But other members of the diverse coalition that brought the lawsuit viewed the ruling more critically. Sheila Cohen, president of the Connecticut Education Association, the state’s largest teachers’ union, expressed disappointment that Moukawsher failed to prescribe a fix for the funding disparity between wealthy and poor school districts.

“Unfortunately, the court declined to provide any remedy for the disparity in resources and revenue for students in the state’s poorest communities — the essence and heart of the … litigation,” Cohen said. “Also, the court’s attempt to impose one-size-fits-all mandates that erode flexibility and local education control penalizes the majority of Connecticut’s schools.”

In his ruling, Moukawsher branded the teacher evaluation process “dysfunctional” and said it is based on inflated standards that have resulted in nearly every educator graded as proficient or exemplary. This drew a sharp response from Jan Hochadel, president of the American Federation of Teachers-Connecticut.

Moukawsher’s comments regarding accountability and teacher evaluations “were not just disappointing, but disrespectful of education professionals.”

The extraordinary ruling orders the state to revamp virtually all areas of public education — from the hiring and firing of teachers, to special education services, to education standards for elementary and high school students. He also criticized the state’s generous reimbursement policy for school construction projects, especially in an age of decreasing enrollment.

“To get rid of an irrational policy, adopt a rational one,” Moukawsher said in his ruling. “It’s the court’s job to require the state to have one. It’s the state’s job to develop one. The court will judge the state’s solutions, and if they meet the standards described in this decision, uphold them.”

The case highlighted longstanding inequities between Connecticut’s urban and largely poor school districts and the state’s wealthier — and higher achieving — suburban school districts. Moukawsher was sharply critical of Connecticut’s “befuddled and misdirected” education policies that have left cities without adequate resources and denied children their constitutional right to an equal education.

“We are very, very happy that very soon, we hope, the situation for Connecticut students will dramatically improve,” Joseph Moodhe, lawyer for the plaintiffs, said outside the courthouse, moments after Moukawsher finished reading his decision. “We are confident that the educational department, as well as the legislators and the executive branch, will give careful consideration to the findings … and make appropriate efforts to address them in the coming months.”

Malloy, who has made education policy a cornerstone of his administration, said he welcomes the “conversation this decision brings.”

“Since I took office, the state has invested hundreds of millions of dollars in education with an overwhelming share directed at supporting our students who need it the most,” the Democratic governor said in a statement. “These investments are working – students across the board are showing growth in math and reading on recent state tests. At the same time, we know there is more work to do and we remain resolute in our commitment to improve educational outcomes for all our students.”

The ruling sets the stage for a showdown at the Capitol over education policy when the legislature convenes in January. “We want to use this as a moment of positive change,” said Senate Majority Leader Bob Duff of Norwalk. “This could be our clarion moment for education reform.”

Several lawmakers questioned the tight time frame set by Moukawsher. House Republican Leader Themis Klarides said a six-month deadline to come up with the proposals demanded by the judge was “not realistic.”

Deputy Majority Leader Bob Godfrey of Danbury agreed and said nothing is likely to happen before March.

“We’re already a quarter of the way through the fiscal year. We can’t go to small towns and say, ‘Give us back the money.’ School is in session. This is going to be a lengthy debate, and it won’t be limited just to the formula.”

Godfrey said the ruling corrects the huge gap in education funding between rich and poor communities. “The political problem is getting 76 votes in the House and 19 in the Senate to reform it because [lawmakers] are never going to cut education spending to their towns,” he said. “But we’re going to be forced to do exactly that.”

New Britain school board President Sharon Beloin-Saavedra said she hopes the General Assembly doesn’t allow politics to derail the drive for education funding reform, but acknowledged the likelihood of suburban legislators working to maintain their communities’ state aid.

“If the state can’t afford additional dollars and it’s a reallocation of the existing pie, you’ll have people screaming – the people who are going to be losing a share,” she said.

In addition to a lengthy battle at the legislature, the ruling could set off more legal scuffling. During the trial, which lasted 60 days, lawyers in the attorney general’s office argued that the state’s investment in education is enough to provide an adequate education. They cited the substantial resources Connecticut devotes to its public schools, including hundreds of millions of additional dollars directed to low-performing districts in recent years.

Moukawsher was unimpressed. “Too little money is chasing too many needs,” he said, warning lawmakers not to make a “mockery of the state’s constitution.”

In urban districts, “most of the students are being let down by patronizing and illusory degrees,” Moukawsher said. “The state is failing poor students by giving them unearned degrees” by graduating them without the skills needed for higher education.”

In particular, the judge noted a dysfunctional teacher evaluation system where “everyone succeeds” and where student success isn’t considered. “Good teachers can’t be recognized and bad teachers can’t be removed,” Moukawsher said.

Moukawsher blasted the General Assembly for a recent round of cuts to public schools in the state’s poorest cities. “There could not be a worse time to move education money from struggling school districts,” Moukawsher said. “But the state did it anyway.”

The court cannot dictate the amount of education spending, Moukawsher concluded, “but spending … must follow a formula influenced only by school needs and good practices.”

The sweeping implications of the case, which began as a project for Yale Law School students, were evident from the start, said David Rosen, a New Haven lawyer who teaches at the school’s Educational Adequacy Project. “This was a high stakes case from Day 1,” he said. “The fact that the court has now ruled in favor of Connecticut’s children is simply momentous.”

Courant staff writers Christopher Keating, Jenna Carlesso, Matthew Kauffman, Kathleen Megan, Kathleen McWilliams, Don Stacom and Shawn R. Beals contributed to this story.

 
Other related coverage regarding this ruling can be found at:

STATE FACES BIG TASK COMPLYING WITH JUDGE’S RULING

  • What does Judge Thomas Moukawsher’s ruling do?
  • Declaring that “change must come,” the Superior Court judge ordered far-reaching changes in public education, including creating a more equal and “rational” system for distributing billions in state funds to local schools.
  • What was the basis for the judge’s ruling?
  • The judge agreed with the plaintiffs that unequal educational performance in Connecticut, notably in the state’s largest and poorest cities, is the state’s responsibility and that the “irrational” education system that exists in Connecticut violates students’ constitutional right to an adequate education.
  • http://www.courant.com/health/hc-school-funding-qna-0908-20160907-story.html
 
On Monday, Sept 12, 2016, the New York Times Editorial Board wrote on this ruling.  We encourage visitors to read read that editorial here: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/12/opinion/a-holistic-ruling-on-broken-schools.html?

OneWorld community television programs and forums focus on three areas. 

1) Improving Education (at every level).  We work with students, parents, educators and education specialists to address issues that are intended to inform and engage– thereby having a positive impact.  Link to Education Agenda: http://www.oneworldpi.org/education/

2) Health Literacy: We work to promote overall good health; reduce disparities in health care outcomes by promoting health literacy, working to improve access, and encouraging proactive behaviors, and

3) Civic Engagement:  We strive to Strengthen Families and Communities by focusing on the constructive and productive ways we can all work together to make a positive difference in our communities.

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do at any given time and on an ongoing basis.  We invite and appreciate technical and financial support.

We at OneWorld invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support. Write to us at: OneWorld, Inc. P.O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531

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Protecting Our Brain As We Age: Avoiding Dementia Road

OneWorld Progressive Institute

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996. Please visit our YouTube channel to see examples of our work.  After watching, if you like the video, please indicate that with a thumbs up: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6 

Health Literacy, Education and Civic Engagement are the main areas of focus.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau report  for 2010, there were then more Americans age 65 and older than at any other time in U.S. history.

There were 40.3 million people age 65 and older on April 1, 2010, up 5.3 percent from 35 million in 2000. 

By July 1, 2013, there were 44.7 million people who were 65 and older in the United States. This group accounted for 14.1 percent of the total population, and represents a 4.4 percent increase in three plus  years.

As of January 2016, America recorded 46 million . That number of Americans ages 65 and older is projected to more than double from 46 million today to over 98 million by 2060, and the 65-and-older age group’s share of the total population will rise to nearly 24 percent from 15 percent.

There will be many challenges taxing health, education and social systems across the board.  One major challenge will be adequate and appropriate health care, especially in nursing homes.  “Demand for elder care will be fueled by a steep rise in the number of Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease, which could nearly triple by 2050 to 14 million, from 5 million in 2013.”  Find much more information and projections at the link below.  Not all of the above information is listed at PRB. http://www.prb.org/Publications/Media-Guides/2016/aging-unitedstates-fact-sheet.aspx

Dementia and Cancer are the two BIG health fears many older people have; understandably.  The question is — can we prevent dementia?  If so, how?  The information provided in the New York Times article linked below offer some suggestions.  OneWorld puts the information here because it is from a trusted source, and because in today’s climate not everyone can access articles in the New York Times.  We encourage our OneWorld visitors to read and share the article; it is rather hopeful.  Below the article we have linked two short OneWorld video segments (less than 10 mins each) of programs about Alzheimer’s disease and being a caregiver.  Please indicate to us if you found each helpful, and please SHARE them with others.

The full 1-hr DVDs are available from OneWorld for a small contribution of $20 each.  Visitors can order the videos by sending a request to:  OneWorld, Inc.  P. O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531 Checks should be made payable to: OneWorld, Inc. 

NOTE: DO NOT PLACE THE ORDER THROUGH OUR WEB SITE.  OUR MAIL ORDER SYSTEM IS NOT WORKING.  

Vitamin B12 as Protection for the Aging Brain

As a woman of a certain age who consumes a well-balanced diet of all the usual food groups, including reasonable amounts of animal protein, I tend to dismiss advice to take a multivitamin supplement. I’ve been told repeatedly by nutrition experts that the overuse of dietary supplements for “nutritional insurance” has given Americans the most expensive urine in the world.

I do take a daily supplement of vitamin D, based on considerable evidence of its multiple health benefits, especially for older people. However, based on advice from the National Academy of Medicine and an examination of accumulating research, I’m prompted to consider also taking a vitamin B12 supplement in hopes of protecting my aging brain.

Animal protein foods — meat, fish, milk, cheese and eggs — are the only reliable natural dietary sources of B12, and I do get ample amounts of several in my regular diet. But now at age 75, I wonder whether I’m still able to reap the full benefit of what I ingest.

You see, the ability to absorb B12 naturally present in foods depends on the presence of adequate stomach acid, the enzyme pepsin and a gastric protein called intrinsic factor to release the vitamin from the food protein it is attached to. Only then can the vitamin be absorbed by the small intestine. As people age, acid-producing cells in the stomach may gradually cease to function, a condition called atrophic gastritis.

A century ago, researchers discovered that some people — most likely including Mary Todd Lincoln — had a condition called pernicious anemia, a deficiency of red blood cells ultimately identified as an autoimmune disease that causes a loss of stomach cells needed for B12 absorption. Mrs. Lincoln was known to behave erratically and was ultimately committed to a mental hospital.

“Depression, dementia and mental impairment are often associated with” a deficiency of B12 and its companion B vitamin folate, “especially in the elderly,” Dr. Rajaprabhakaran Rajarethinam, a psychiatrist at Wayne State University School of Medicine, has written.

He described a 66-year-old woman hospitalized with severe depression, psychosis and a loss of energy and interest in life who had extremely low blood levels of B12 and whose symptoms were almost entirely reversed by injections of the vitamin.

European researchers have also shown that giving B12 to people deficient in the vitamin helped protect many of the areas of the brain damaged by Alzheimer’s disease. In a two-year study at the University of Oxford of 270 people older than 70 with mild cognitive impairment and low B12 levels, Dr. Helga Refsum, a professor of nutrition at the University of Oslo, found reduced cerebral atrophy in those treated with high doses of the vitamin.

“A B12 vitamin deficiency as a cause of cognitive issues is more common than we think, especially among the elderly who live alone and don’t eat properly,” Dr. Rajarethinam said.

“The academy estimates that between 10 percent and 30 percent of people older than 50 produce too little stomach acid to release B12 from its carrier protein in foods, and as the years advance, the percentage of low-acid producers rises.

“But many people do not know they produce inadequate amounts of stomach acid. In fact, evidence from a study of young adults called the Framingham Offspring Study suggests that insufficient absorption of B12 from foods may even be common among adults aged 26 to 49, so the following advice may pertain to them as well.

“The academy recommends that adults older than 50 get most of their daily requirement of B12 — 2.4 micrograms for people 14 and older, slightly more for women who are pregnant or nursing — from a synthetic form of the vitamin found in foods fortified with B12 or in a multivitamin supplement. Synthetic B12 is not attached to protein and thus bypasses the need for stomach acid. Given that I eat very few fortified foods, a supplement with B12 is likely to be my best option.”

“Certain groups besides older people are also at risk of a B12 deficiency. They include vegetarians and vegans who consume little or no animal foods; people with disorders of the stomach and small intestine like celiac disease and Crohn’s disease; chronic users of proton-pump inhibitors to control acid reflux; and people whose digestive systems were surgically reduced for weight-loss or treatment for cancer or ulcerative colitis.

“Among those most likely to be B12 deficient are the older patients in nursing homes whose diets are limited, and this deficiency may account in part for the symptoms of cognitive dysfunction so common among nursing home residents.

“While a B12 deficiency can take years to develop, encroaching symptoms can be distressing and eventually devastating. It can also be challenging to link such symptoms to a nutrient deficiency.

“In an online posting in July, David G. Schardt, the senior nutritionist for the Center for Science in the Public Interest, noted that symptoms of B12 deficiency include fatigue, tingling and numbness in the hands and feet, muscle weakness and loss of reflexes, which may progress to confusion, depression, memory loss and dementia as the deficiency grows more severe.

“Early symptoms can be reversed by treatment with high doses of B12, usually given by injection. But symptoms related to nerve damage and dementia are more likely to be permanent. Thus, it is especially important for people at risk of a B12 deficiency to have their blood tested for it periodically. For example, experts at Kaiser Permanente in Oakland, Calif., suggest that chronic users of proton-pump inhibitors should have their B12 level tested every two years.

“Vegetarians and vegans need not despair. In addition to B12 supplements, various commercially prepared plant-based foods, like some breakfast cereals, nondairy milks and soy products and one type of nutritional yeast, are fortified with synthetic B12. The Vegan Society recommends eating two to three servings a day of fortified foods to get at least three micrograms of B12.

“However, Dr. Ralph Carmel, a retired hematologist now affiliated with New York University who studied the effects of B12 for decades, cautions against taking megadoses of the vitamin. He said in an interview that too often, “People who really need B12 don’t get it, and those who don’t need it, like athletes, often take huge doses — 2,000 or 5,000 micrograms a day. We don’t know what such doses can do in the long run. If an older person has low-ish B12 levels, I don’t object to taking 500 or 1,000 micrograms a day, but 5,000 is ridiculous.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/06/well/mind/vitamin-b12-as-protection-for-the-aging-brain.html? 

Alzheimers Disease is the leading form of dementia; 50-70 percent of those with dementia suffers from Alzheimers.

“This is Alzheimer’s Disease” – by OneWorld Progressive Institute. Visitors can order DVD copies of the 1-hr programs

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do at any given time and on an ongoing basis.  We invite and appreciate technical and financial support.

We at OneWorld invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support. Write to us at: OneWorld, Inc. P.O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531

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Kudos to Megan Rapinoe (& others) for The COURAGE TO KNEEL

OneWorld Progressive Institute

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996. Please visit our YouTube channel to see examples of our work: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6  Education, Health Literacy (HL) and Civic Engagement are our main areas of focus. Visitors can learn much more about OneWorld’s investment in education by visiting: http://www.oneworldpi.org/education/  See Civic Engagement here: http://www.oneworldpi.org/civic_engagement/ and HL: http://www.oneworldpi.org/health/

COLIN KAEPERNICK STARTED SOMETHING IMPORTANT:  It was because of a protest against British rule  why America came into being.  Those who are burning his jersey and calling him un-American are ignorant of America’s history and what this country says it stands for.  Colin Kaepernick is protesting injustice.  That is VERY American He should be praised for his courage and his concerns about other human beings who are not treated fairly, humanely and with justice.  The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), was about freedom and inalienable rights: according to natural law, these are rights that cannot be taken away, denied, or transferred.  Yet, in America today the rights of many black people are denied or violated daily.

EVIL THRIVES WHEN PEOPLE OF GOODWILL DO NOTHING. Colin Kaepernick did something; he raised awareness of the 3rd verse of the National Anthem and called attention to continued injustice against Black Americans.  Historians say the 3rd Verse of the Star Spangled Banner Is Racist and deliberately written against Blacks.   Police shoot young black men in the back and no one is held accountable.  Every fair-minded American should be outraged at injustice.  The words of Star-Spangled Banner should be taught and discussed in schools:

“And where is that band who so vauntingly swore,
That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion
A home and a Country should leave us no more?
Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution.
No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.”

After all of the venom that was spewed at Kaepernick, it’s heartening to see support spreading among athletes and other professionals.  We applaud all those who show courage to kneel, moral outrage at injustice, and support for Kaepernick’s action. Many others have paved the way with their lives.

  • Chaney, Goodman and Schwerner (three young American men) were murdered in the fight to get Black Americans the right to vote.
  • Fannie Lou Hamer suffered a crippling beating because she exercised her inalienable right (as an American citizen) to register  to vote.
  • John Lewis took a devastating beating that has left him with physical scars because he marched for his inalienable right as an American.
  • Rosa Parks sat so many others could ride the bus.
  • Thousands of Americans, Blacks, Jews, Christians, Caucasians all fought in various ways for an end to segregation in America.  Yet, in various ways racism rears its ugly, discriminating head all over America in 2016.
  • Too many people are prepared to bury their heads and close their eyes to the injustices that are still pervasive in America. Too many want to keep these atrocities hidden.
  • It’s in our police depts, and in the judiciary system; it’s in our schools, business offices and government agencies.

PLEASE read the Miami Herald and other articles linked below:

Kaepernick’s anthem protest is not un-American, it is closer to the opposite

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick answers questions at a news conference after an NFL preseason football game against the Green Bay Packers Friday, Aug. 26, 2016, in Santa Clara, Calif. Green Bay won the game 21-10.

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick answers questions at a news conference after an NFL preseason football game against the Green Bay Packers Friday, Aug. 26, 2016, in Santa Clara, Calif. Green Bay won the game 21-10. Ben Margot AP Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/sports/spt-columns-blogs/greg-cote/article98740297.html

United States women’s soccer international Megan Rapinoe became the latest sports star to join Colin Kaepernick’s anti-racism protest on Sunday, choosing to kneel during the national anthem before Seattle Reign’s NWSL game against the Chicago Red Stars. It’s already announced that she will be punished.  Imagine that! She will be punished for standing up against injustice in America!  What a great message to send to the the world.  America — the bastion of freedom and equality– punished those who stand up against oppression, brutality and racial injustice.  What else is new?  Kudos to Megan for her courage, decency, and fine example.  Those in charge of the United States soccer International could learn a lesson or two from Megan. 

This is U.S. soccer star Megan Rapinoe joining Colin Kaepernick and kneeling during the national anthem yesterday.  Sept 4, 2016  –

Three Black Volleyball Athletes Salute Kaepernick, Kneel During Anthem

“Everyone should be treated equally, no matter their color, age, sex, anything,” one of the players said.

Image result for usable picture of three volleyball athletes to Kaepernick

Colin Kaepernick’s protest of the national anthem has inspired many athletes to follow suit, including three black college volleyball players at West Virginia Tech University.

The student athletes showed their support of Kaepernick’s act of defiance by kneeling as “The Star-Spangled Banner” played at the start of their game on Wednesday.

Keyona Morrow, who is the vice president of the university’s Black Student Union organization, said she and her teammates participated in the protest because they agree with Kaepernick’s stance in speaking out against the systemic oppression of black people in America.

“Everyone should be treated equally, no matter their color, age, sex, anything,” Morrow told WCHS news. “Everyone needs to be treated the same way.”

The players, whose names have not all yet been identified, join professional athletes across a variety of teams who have also saluted Kaepernick’s efforts and pursued similar actions.

“He’s exercising his right to choose to sit or stand, so you have to recognize that he’s got that right,” Morrow said. “I hope that it just makes people reconsider before they judge someone for something.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/three-black-volleyball-athletes-salute-kaepernick-kneel-during-anthem_us_57d2d5d2e4b06a74c9f44803

As Kaepernick Takes a Knee, More Athletes Refuse to Stand During National Anthem

Image: Denver Broncos' Marshall Kneels in Protest During National Anthem

Denver Broncos’ Marshall Kneels in Protest During National Anthem http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/brandon-marshall-broncos-kneel-anthem/2016/09/09/id/7

LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony, Chris Paul and Dwayne Wade Call for End to Police Brutality, Gun Violence

Woodrow Wilson players and coaches ‘TAKE A KNEE’ during national anthem

Woodrow Wilson coaches, players kneel during national anthem

JWILSON11

“Woodrow Wilson High School football coach Preston Brown told his players before Saturday’s season opener that he planned to take a knee during the national anthem.

All but two of them followed his lead.

Brown and most of his assistant coaches along with nearly all of the players knelt while the national anthem was played on a hot, humid afternoon at Mike Rozier Stadium in East Camden.

“I still love America. I still love our military,” Brown said. “But this was our way of saying that things have to change in our country. There’s oppression, there’s social injustice, and these kids live it.”

Brown said he was inspired to kneel by San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, whose decision to sit during the national anthem of an NFL exhibition game has triggered a national debate and inspired other athletes to take similar actions.

Woodrow Wilson seniors Edwin Lopez and Tylers Parsons stood during the national anthem.

Lopez, a Rutgers recruit as a defensive back, said his teammates and coaches “have the right to so what they want” but felt strongly that he should stand.

“I’ve always stood for the national anthem and I wasn’t going to let a little incident in the NFL change that,” Lopez said. “I wasn’t going to switched the script. That’s not me.”

Woodrow Wilson’s team is predominantly black with several Hispanic players.

Highland senior two-way end Joe Tripoli, who is white, said the scene “bothered” him.

“I didn’t think it was right — I have a lot of family in the military,” Tripoli said after Highland’s 13-7 victory.

“Highland senior running back Orlando Council, who is black, also expressed disappointment in the decision by the players and coaches from Woodrow Wilson.

“There are people out there every day risking their lives for us,” Council said.

Brown, a second-year coach, is a Woodrow Wilson graduate. He played college football at Tulane University in New Orleans.

“There were things that I saw, things that I experienced as an African-American student-athlete in the South,” Brown said. “I’ve seen what’s happened to people that look like me.”

Brown said he was again struck in the early days of another school year by the struggles of many of his players and other youngsters in Camden.

“You’ve got kids who are in a school system where there aren’t enough quality teachers,” Brown said. “They’re hungry and they can’t get ‘seconds’ at lunch. It’s so many things that these kids go through.”

http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/phil-anastasia/Woodrow-Wilson-coaches-players-kneel-during-national-anthem.html

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do at any given time and on an ongoing basis.  We invite and appreciate technical and financial support.

We at OneWorld invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support. Write to us at: OneWorld, Inc. P.O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531

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Evidence PTAs Play Political Role in Gentrifying Communities

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 OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer  organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT  community since 1996.  Please visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6    Our comprehensive Education Section is here: http://www.oneworldpi.org/education/  We ask that you share us with others.  It is imperative that all parents know that they have the right to advocate for their children.  Effective advocacy is not the exclusive province of the wealthy and the powerful.  At OneWorld we show parents how they can be effective advocates.

Evidence PTAs Play Political Role in Gentrifying Communities: The conections between money, politics, power and education are evident throughout the USA. The connections are particularly evident in places such as New Haven, CT, and in towns where the demographics are very mixed. In the Casey Quinlan article — linked below in its entirety– several of the highlights were added by OneWorld to place emphasis and draw specific attention to those sections.

THE TRICKY POLITICS OF PTAs IN GENTRIFYING COMMUNITIES (The Atlantic)

How Marginalized Families Are Pushed Out of PTAs

  • Written by Casey Quinlan, July 13, 2016 (Casey Quinlan is an education reporter at ThinkProgress. Her writing has appeared in The Establishment, Dame, The Toast, and Bitch.

    Parents with socioeconomic resources are more likely to exert influence on school officials.

 “When Rolling Terrace Elementary School in Takoma Park, Maryland, told parents in the fall of 2014 that it would allow students to use Chromebooks as a way to bridge the digital divide between low-income families and affluent families, there were mixed reactions. The plan was aimed at helping students become more adept at using technology, but the affluent parents, most of whom were white, were apprehensive about their children getting more screen time.

Alison Risso, then the president of the school’s PTA, said she was frustrated by the complaints those parents expressed at a meeting. “Everyone who could pay for that Chromebook with the money in their pockets was in the room,” Risso said. As Risso recalled, one parent said to her, “I don’t need my daughter to learn to make a PowerPoint.”

 At Rolling Terrace, 68 percent of the students receive free or reduced-price lunch. Sixty-three percent of its population is Hispanic, 15 percent is black, and another 15 percent is white. But the parents of that sliver of the student population that is white and affluent—most of whom were drawn to the school’s Spanish-immersion program—have outsize influence over what happens in the school.

Risso explained to parents why it was important for the lower-income children to have access to the Chromebooks. Many of the school’s parents—mostly low-income people of color who didn’t attend the PTA meeting—were excited about the computers.

Despite the differences in priorities, the school’s parents are expected to make decisions as a community. That kind of unity rarely happens in gentrifying neighborhoods, however. When white, affluent parents come into a school that has a high percentage of less-affluent students of color, the more advantaged group tends to take over parent organizations and unintentionally marginalize the parent community that was already there. Ultimately, Rolling Terrace proceeded with its plan to use Chromebooks, but not all such issues are resolved in ways that give low-income parents a voice.

That’s unfortunate because parental engagement can greatly improve adolescents’ academic and emotional functioning, according to a 2014 study published in Child Development. A substantial body of research also indicates that parent involvement at home and school is an important factor in improving young children’s literacy and math skills. PTA membership was also associated with student achievement in a 2006 School Community Journal study authored by researchers at the University of West Florida.

Allyson Criner Brown, the associate director at the nonprofit Teaching for Change, said she has seen small groups of advantaged parents, many of them members of parent organizations, wield great influence on school policy. They often push for programs that would benefit their own children and not necessarily the kids of less means. When these parents don’t get what they want, they often make calls to someone higher up than the principal, such as the superintendent, to flex their muscle—something lower-income parents rarely do.

“[Affluent] parents are much more likely to think they have the right to tell principals what they think.” 

The influence of the PTA depends a lot on the given school’s culture and in part on how big a role parents play in fundraising. It can be challenging for a busy principal to seek input from parent groups, especially when those organizations aren’t financially supporting a cash-strapped school.

“If the principal knows that the PTA is not a source for fundraising, depending on the principal they might not go to the PTA and ask parents if [a particular project] is a priority,” said Alexandra Freidus, doctoral candidate in urban education at New York University. In wealthy or socioeconomically diverse communities, on the other hand, “principals frequently count on parents to fill in budget gaps. Those parents are much more likely to think they have the right to tell principals what they think, to believe their opinions matters to the school, and they’re much more likely to be a dominant voice.” And while it’s true that kids of all backgrounds benefit from attending integrated schools, affluent and white parents tend to think they’re the ones bringing value to their school, according to research released earlier this year.

The imbalance of power has become especially clear in recent years as parents with means in gentrifying neighborhoods look for schools that will enrich their kids’ lives—schools with diverse student populations, for example, and supplemental-learning opportunities. Schools serving high numbers of poor children often offer Spanish-immersion or gifted-and-talented programs that attract affluent families, which often bring with them the ability to fundraise. (Although Spanish-immersion programs were initially meant to serve children who spoke Spanish at home and were still learning English, they have become increasingly popular across the country with non-Latino parents whose children speak primarily or only English at home, according to a 2015 dissertation for the City University of New York’s urban-education program.) But the ability can also mean wealthy families wield disproportionate influence on campus and in the PTA.

According to Freidus, the current body of research on parent engagement in gentrifying schools shows that schools tends to accommodate those parents’ interests and concerns. Freidus analyzed a decade of posts in a listserv for parents new to the school and neighborhood and discovered how quickly one unidentified Brooklyn school and its ostensible priorities evolved as the student population became whiter and more affluent. The percentage of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch fell from 90 percent in the 2003-04 school year to 65 percent in the 2011-12 year. At the same time, the school spent much of its resources on the playground and other facilities rather than efforts to get classroom computers and support for the student prom.

Criner Brown said she has seen similar issues play out in Washington, D.C., schools. In some cases, according to Criner Brown, white and affluent parents begin advocating for their children before they even attend the school. “Yes, it is parent advocacy, but a more forceful and entitled version that is more of a demand than a request,” she said. 

 Kelly Wickham Hurst, an education advocate and former guidance dean at Lincoln Magnet School in Springfield, Illinois, said PTAs rarely discuss race directly, instead using words that “refer to race while not referring to race” out of fear that they’d otherwise appear racist. When disadvantaged parents do try to speak up, they’re often dismissed by other parents or by administrators, Wickham Hurst said. Parents of color, she said, bring up concerns about testing and how to help students who are underperforming, but are sometimes brushed off. As one parent spoke, she recalled, a white PTO member who is considered an education expert by parents because she works in the district, sighed and rolled her eyes.

A mother of color also told Wickham Hurst that she and another nonwhite parent were dropping out of the PTO because their concerns were always left in the “parking lot” to be discussed another time—time that never came. “I’ve been cussed out many times in my career by a very frustrated parent who has never been listened to in school systems who would like to be heard but they never say it in the ‘right way,’” said Wickham Hurst, adding that black parents tell her they never hear from the school unless it’s about student discipline. Students of color are suspended at disproportionate rates, with some studies indicating teacher bias plays a role in determining discipline.

Alina Adams, the author of Getting Into NYC Kindergarten, works with many parents of color who are trying to get their children into New York City-area elementary schools; she also helps parents adjust to the schools once they’re there. According to Adams, many parents of color express concern that they won’t be listened to at the school. “[Reluctance to speak up] gets magnified when it’s someone of a different race than you or different ethnicity or different economic background,” she said. “Maybe you don’t speak English so well and you feel intimidated by that. How do I challenge this person on this issue when I know that she’s a lawyer and I [just] have a high-school diploma?”

The data bears out some of Adams’s points about disadvantaged parents’ lack of involvement. Lower educational levels are a factor in their limited engagement, as is having a lower socioeconomic status and being an underrepresented minority, a 2013 study on Parental Readiness Empowerment Programs shows. Meanwhile, a 2014 paper that analyzed black parents at an urban middle school found that perceptions of racism and hostile parent-teacher interactions were significant barriers to their engagement at school.

“I get questions about how things work rather than complaints about why things are happening.”

Meanwhile, Myra Rivera-Blanco, the fundraising co-chair of the Rolling Terrace PTA, said that Latino parents tend to ask different questions about family engagement because, culturally, they see school participation differently. “I get questions about how things work rather than complaints about why things are happening,” she said. Many Latino parents believe they should trust the school to handle their child’s education appropriately and are less inclined to question teachers and administrators.

Rivera-Blanco is the main contact for many Latino families as one of few Latina members of the PTA; she also serves as the de facto translator at meetings. Rivera-Blanco said many of the school’s lower-income parents don’t have access to laptops and even cell phones, which makes communication especially difficult.

When schools are cash-strapped, the priorities of the members of the parent organization often become the priorities of the school as a whole. Rivera-Blanco says she sees this dynamic play out often at Rolling Terrace with the Spanish-immersion program, which is populated largely by students with means. For example, parents of kids in the program ensure that its teachers receive gift cards at the beginning of the year and during Teacher Appreciation Week to pay for supplies. “There are parents in our school that can’t put enough cents together to get a coat much less give their teacher their supply list,” Rivera-Blanco said. “That imbalance is huge. You can walk into a classroom and know which is a Spanish-immersion classroom and which one isn’t.”

The history of the PTA shows that these race and class dynamics have always been an issue. Christine A. Woyshner explores this context in her 2009 book The National PTA, Race, and Civic Engagement, 1897-1970, exploring how white affluent women who founded what is today known as the National PTA used their influence to achieve reforms. The “black PTA,” or the National Congress of Colored Parents and Teachers, on the other hand, was more concerned with ensuring their schools had the basics.

(Read a related article written by Laura McKenna, Education titled: How Rich Parents Can Exacerbate School Inequality.  Fundraising efforts often give their kids an academic edge.  http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2016/01/rich-parents-school-inequality/431640/ )

Parent organizations could improve their outreach to low-income parents and parents of color through various means. Experts on parent engagement suggest encouraging parents of color and low-income parents to work together to avoid feeling isolated and using co-chairs to ensure that both advantaged newcomers and disadvantaged have opportunities to influence school policy.

Karen Mapp, a senior lecturer on education at Harvard who has conducted research on family engagement, said that one of the most important factors in whether disadvantaged-parent voices are heard is whether a school leader decides to make inclusion a priority. Mapp pointed to Boston’s William W.Henderson School, where the former principal made it a priority to ensure that the school reached out to all parents and fostered trustful relationships that in turn made parents participate more often in school activities.

Halley Potter, a fellow at the Century Foundation, pointed out that some charter schools, such as Blackstone Valley Prep Academy in Rhode Island, have co-chairs and require that a seat on the PTA be assigned to a bilingual parent to help ensure all parents’ concerns are acknowledged. When asked what she thought of the path to diverse parent engagement in schools where students are separated by gifted-and-talented programs and general education, Potter said it’s hard to bridge that divide. Unless every classroom in the school is diverse, the parents’ goals are usually too different. “It’s very hard in those situations to create an equitable school engagement and school governance model because ideally what you want in an integrated school is people are fighting together for all of their children,” Potter said. A model where all students are challenged and their particular talents are developed through similar approaches to gifted classes, otherwise known as a “schoolwide-enrichment model,” may be the best way to pursue true diversity, she said.

Parents, teachers, and administrators should state their goals clearly and work on fostering trust between low-income parents and parents of color, according to a 2013 paper from SEDL out of the Institutes for Research and the U.S. Department of Education. Schools could also increase communication through home visits, such as those made at William W. Henderson School.

As Potter said of Blackstone Valley Prep Academy, school administrators have to do more than hope families will get along. “They had to make sure that they were intentional about shared leadership,” Potter said.

http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2016/07/how-marginalized-families-are-pushed-out-of-ptas/491036/?

Below are links to some of the education-related programs produced by volunteers/educators at OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc:

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do at any given time and on an ongoing basis.  We invite and appreciate technical and financial support.

We at OneWorld invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support. Write to us at: OneWorld, Inc. P.O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531

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