ACA, Medicaid & Medicare ALL On Trump’s GOP’s Chopping Block

OneWorld Progressive Institute OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer  organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996. Please visit our YouTube channel to see examples of our work: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6  Civic Engagement, Education and Health Literacy are our main areas of focus. Visitors can learn much more about OneWorld’s investment in each area by visiting the following links:  Health Education and Information is about Consumers Health Literacy. This is important to all. Visit this link to learn more:  http://www.oneworldpi.org/health/

  1. Our Education Agenda  programs are found here: http://www.oneworldpi.org/education/   And Civic Engagement  programs (engaging the community) are found here:
  2.  http://www.oneworldpi.org/civic_engagement/  
  3. Our FaceBook page is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB
  4. If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others. Our goal is to provide good information to our participating communities.

The election is over and the chickens are coming home to roost. The LIES are being revealed.  Of course, it’s too late.  Those who think they were voting for positive change are in for great devastating surprises.  Of course, the very wealthy knew exactly what they were voting for and they will be fine.  Donald Trump’s new policies and practices will make the rich even richer; they have nothing to lose.  For the average American, including those whites who believed they were going back to the America of 50 years ago, when they were in charge of everything and people of color would have to all take a backseat, they will also be surprised.  Maybe not losing jobs to others, but they are in for other shocks to their system.  If we want to get biblical — we could say its the wages of sin.  When we buy into racist philosophy, plans and practices and support racist policies, at some point in time we will be called to account.  In the readings below it is clear that Trump and the GOP could care less about average Americans.  However, for ALL senior citizens and their loved ones who care about having access to health care, it’s is not too late if you realize what is about to happen and ACT NOW to PREVENT IT because it’s:

Not Just Obamacare: Medicaid and Medicare Are Also On GOP’s Chopping Block.

When it comes to Medicare, it is the most egregious.  Millions of us paid into Medicare for decades. It is a social contract with our government; now Donald Trump, Paul Ryan and their wealthy cronies are planning to take it all away. How can they be stopped? THEY MUST BE STOPPED. THIS CANNOT BE ALLOWED TO HAPPEN!

Paul Krugman is a Nobel Award-winning economist. (Krugman was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (informally the Nobel Prize in Economics), the sole recipient for 2008. )  He has written extensively in the New York Times and elsewhere about the economic and political dangers of a Trump presidency.   The NY Times article linked below in its entirety is one that every adult American, regardless of age should read.  Of course, the wealthy don’t have to read it; they will not be affected, but the rest of us will; some more than others. In the article below Krugman talks about three points to be made as LOUDLY as possible about Medicare Killers:

  1. The attack on Medicare will be one of the most blatant violations of a campaign promise in history.
  2. While Medicare is an essential program for a great majority of Americans, it’s especially important for the white working-class voters who supported Mr. Trump most strongly. Partly that’s because Medicare beneficiaries are considerably whiter than the country as a whole, precisely because they’re older and reflect the demography of an earlier era.
  3. People like Paul Ryan, the speaker of the House, have often managed to bamboozle the media into believing that their (Republican) efforts to dismantle Medicare and other programs are driven by valid economic concerns. They are not.

The Medicare Killers

During the campaign, Donald Trump often promised to be a different kind of Republican, one who would represent the interests of working-class voters who depend on major government programs. “I’m not going to cut Social Security like every other Republican and I’m not going to cut Medicare or Medicaid,” he declared, under the headline “Why Donald Trump Won’t Touch Your Entitlements.”

It was, of course, a lie. The transition team’s point man on Social Security is a longtime advocate of privatization, and all indications are that the incoming administration is getting ready to kill Medicare, replacing it with vouchers that can be applied to the purchase of private insurance. Oh, and it’s also likely to raise the age of Medicare eligibility.

So it’s important not to let this bait-and-switch happen before the public realizes what’s going on.

Three points in particular need to be made as loudly as possible.

First, the attack on Medicare will be one of the most blatant violations of a campaign promise in history.

Older Americans will face difficult choices if President-elect Donald Trump does not preserve Medicare. Eric Thayer for The New York Times

Some readers may recall George W. Bush’s attempt to privatize Social Security, in which he claimed a “mandate” from voters despite having run a campaign entirely focused on other issues. That was bad, but this is much worse — and not just because Mr. Trump lost the popular vote by a significant margin, making any claim of a mandate bizarre.

Candidate Trump ran on exactly the opposite position from the one President-elect Trump seems to be embracing, claiming to be an economic populist defending the (white) working class. Now he’s going to destroy a program that is crucial to that class?

Which brings me to the second point: While Medicare is an essential program for a great majority of Americans, it’s especially important for the white working-class voters who supported Mr. Trump most strongly. Partly that’s because Medicare beneficiaries are considerably whiter than the country as a whole, precisely because they’re older and reflect the demography of an earlier era.

Beyond that, think of what would happen if Medicare didn’t exist. Some older Americans would probably be able to retain health coverage by staying at jobs that come with such coverage. But this option would by and large be available only to those with extensive education: Labor force participation among seniors is strongly correlated with education, in part because the highly educated are healthier than the less educated, and in part because their jobs require less physical effort. Working-class seniors would be left stranded, unable to get the health care they needed.

Still, doesn’t something have to be done about Medicare? No — which is my third point. People like Paul Ryan, the speaker of the House, have often managed to bamboozle the media into believing that their efforts to dismantle Medicare and other programs are driven by valid economic concerns. They aren’t.

“It has been obvious for a long time that Medicare is actually more efficient than private insurance, mainly because it doesn’t spend large sums on overhead and marketing, and, of course, it needn’t make room for profits.

“What’s not widely known is that the cost-saving measures included in the Affordable Care Act, a.k.a. Obamacare, have been remarkably successful in their efforts to “bend the curve” — to rein in the long-term rise in Medicare expenses. In fact, since 2010 Medicare outlays per beneficiary have risen only 1.4 percent a year, less than the inflation rate. This success is one main reason long-term budget projections have dramatically improved.

“So why try to destroy this successful program, which is in important respects doing better than ever? The main answer, from the point of view of people like Mr. Ryan, is probably that Medicare is in the cross hairs precisely because of its success: It would be very helpful for opponents of government to do away with a program that clearly demonstrates the power of government to improve people’s lives.

“And there’s an additional benefit to the right from Medicare privatization: It would create a lot of opportunities for private profits, earned by diverting dollars that could have been used to provide health care.

“In summary, then, privatizing Medicare would betray a central promise of the Trump campaign, would specifically betray the interests of the voter bloc that thought it had found a champion, and would be terrible policy.

“You might think this would make the whole idea a non-starter. And this push will, in fact, fail — just like Social Security privatization in 2005 — if voters realize what’s happening.

“What’s crucial now is to make sure that voters do, in fact, realize what’s going on. And this isn’t just a job for politicians. It’s also a chance for the news media, which failed so badly during the campaign, to start doing its job.”

Paul Krugman is not the only one sounding the alarm; he is just the most specific and clear.  Conservative, progressive as well as socialist media outlets are also making their contributions as shown in the articles linked below:

1) Three Ways Trump, GOP May Cut Social Security, Medicare – Forbes

www.forbes.com/sites/…/three-ways-trump-gop-may-cut-social-security-medicare/ Nov 16, 2016 – With President-elect Donald Trump leading GOP control of Congress —

  • With President-elect Donald Trump leading GOP control of Congress — and possibly the Supreme Court — what does this mean for your retirement?
  • Well, it’s unlikely there will be any draconian changes to retirement savings vehicles, but watch out for other potential game-changers. Some of them may hurt your ability to save and achieve financial security in your golden years.
  • There are some glaring conflicts between what Trump has said in the campaign and retirement policy going forward. Trump, for example, has said he wouldn’t cut Social Security and Medicare, although Speaker of the House Paul Ryan has long pushed for privatizing both programs. That may ultimately cut benefits.
  • “We’re not going to hurt the people who have been paying into Social Security their whole life,” Trump declared, calling the payment of promised benefits “honoring a deal.”
  • But the man heading the Trump transition team’s Social Security effort? Michael Korbey, a former lobbyist who has spent much of his career advocating for cutting and privatizing the program, according to Yahoo News. 

2) Republican Congress, Trump plan assault on Medicare

By Kate Randall, 26 November 2016  – https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2016/11/26/medi-n26.html

During his election campaign, Donald Trump declared that he had no plans to make “substantial” changes to Medicare, the government-run health insurance plan for the elderly and disabled that covers 55 million Americans. The president-elect’s web site now says his administration will work to “modernize Medicare” and allow more “flexibility” for Medicaid, the health care program for the poor jointly administered by the federal government and the states.

These are code words signaling the readiness of the incoming administration to work with the Republican-controlled Congress to shift Medicare from a guaranteed government program to a plan with fixed government contributions—or vouchers—and to pave the way for the program’s privatization and dismantlement. Medicaid is to suffer a similar fate.

House Speaker Paul Ryan (Republican of Wisconsin) has been explicit about plans to gut Medicare. Under his plan, the government would give those in traditional Medicare a fixed amount to buy insurance. This amount would be tracked to the country’s overall growth rate or another index, plus a percentage increase, but it would not keep pace with rising health care costs. Seniors would eventually pay a larger share of costs, while government costs would shrink.

3) Not Just Obamacare: Medicaid, Medicare Also On GOP’s Chopping Block

The health care safety net as we know it could be bound for extinction.  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/obamacare-medicaid-medicare-gop-chopping-block_us_582a19b8e4b060adb56fbae7

Donald Trump and Republican leaders in Congress have made clear they are serious about repealing Obamacare, and doing so quickly. But don’t assume their dismantling of government health insurance programs will stop there.

For about two decades now, Republicans have been talking about radically changing the government’s two largest health insurance programs, Medicaid and Medicare.

The goal with Medicaid is to turn the program almost entirely over to the states, but with less money to run it. The goal with Medicare is to convert it from a government-run insurance program into a voucher system ― while, once again, reducing the money that goes into the program.

House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) has championed these ideas for years. Trump has not. In fact, in a 2015 interview his campaign website highlighted, he vowed that “I’m not going to cut Medicare or Medicaid.” But the health care agenda on Trump’s transition website, which went live Thursday, vows to “modernize Medicare” and allow more “flexibility” for Medicaid.

In Washington, those are euphemisms for precisely the kind of Medicare and Medicaid plans Ryan has long envisioned. And while it’s never clear what Trump really thinks or how he’ll act, it sure looks like both he and congressional Republicans are out to undo Lyndon Johnson’s health care legacy, not just Barack Obama’s.

Of course, whenever Trump or Republicans talk about dismantling existing government programs, they insist they will replace them with something better ― implying that the people who depend on those programs now won’t be worse off.

But Republicans are not trying to replicate what Medicaid, Medicare and the Affordable Care Act do now. Nor are they trying to maintain the current, historically high level of health coverage nationwide that these programs have produced. Their goal is to slash government spending on health care and to peel back regulations on parts of the health care industry, particularly insurers.

This would mean lower taxes, and an insurance market that operates with less government interference. It would also reduce how many people get help paying for health coverage, and make it so that those who continue to receive government-sponsored health benefits will get less help than they do now.

OneWorld  Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do at any given time and on an ongoing basis.  We invite and appreciate technical and financial support.

We at OneWorld invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support. Write to us at: OneWorld, Inc. P.O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531

Read More      No Comments

Bridging the Parent/Teacher Gap In Education & Communication

OneWorld Progressive Institute OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer  organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996. Please visit our YouTube channel to see examples of our work: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6  Civic Engagement, Education and Health Literacy are our main areas of focus. Visitors can learn much more about OneWorld’s investment in each area by visiting the following links:  Education Agenda http://www.oneworldpi.org/education/ Civic Engagement: http://www.oneworldpi.org/civic_engagement/ and http://www.oneworldpi.org/health/
Our FaceBook page is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB

If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others. Our goal is to provide good information

The New Haven Independent article linked below was written by a student at Wilbur Cross High School.  She was 16 years old and a junior when she covered this OneWorld television program in March 2016.  She had been doing an internship with OneWorld, Inc.  The article was published in March.  We are posting it as a blog in November 2016, because of some recent comments we had from a few people in the community and because of other education-related issues going on in the NHPS district.

How To Bridge The Parent-Teacher Gap

Khadija Hussain Photo

Khadija Hussain Photo – Williams, Smith, Shani, Puglisi, and Johnson.

Principals at three area schools said they know it can difficult for parents to get involved in their children’s education — and said that they’re here to help.

The principals appear on the latest episode of “OneWorld’s Education Agenda.” Filmed last week, it will be broadcast on local public-access TV stations in coming weeks.

N’Zinga Shani, the producer and director of OneWorld Progressive Institute, a not-for-profit educational organization based in New Haven, hosted the program. Her panel of guests included Edith Johnson, Judith Puglisi, and Sarhanna Smith, principals at Wilbur Cross High School, Metropolitan Business Academy, and Read Middle School respectively; Yohuru R. Williams, professor of history at Fairfield University.

A theme emerged during the discussion: A lack of communication between schools and parents breeds a sense of distrust in the administration.

All four educators encouraged parents to reach out more, stressing that high school is a critical time to be involved in children’s lives.

“It’s very important that parents reach out to ask teachers what they can do to help their children,” said Smith. “It’s just as important to follow through with the advice they give you.” Smith said that establishing relationships with teachers is important to do early on.

“It’s very important for parents to build communication networks,” Puglisi pointed out. “Your child is going to have maybe eight different teachers, and do extracurricular activities with different adults. If you reach out to teachers, you’ll also be able to pick whoever you’re most comfortable speaking with.” This, hopefully, will lead to more trusting relationships between parents and teachers.

Johnson, the principal at the largest comprehensive high school in New Haven, acknowledged that there will be shortcomings when it comes to what parents expect from teachers.

“Keep in mind that we have a responsibility to 1,500 kids” at Cross, she said. “Try to come in with an open mind and an open heart.”

In schools where students barely know their guidance counselors, it can be nearly impossible for them to navigate the school system on their own. That’s why, as Johnson emphasized, parents need to be involved as much as they can. “Whether you like the principal and teachers or not, remember that we all want to help your children succeed.”

Smith mentioned some relatively easy ways that parents can help at home: “Reading with your child, even just asking about their days … All these things help develop their vocabulary skills.”

Puglisi added that it’s important to create educational goals with children, and encourage them to set the bar high. “I think children sometimes think that smart kids never ask for help,” she said. “In reality the smartest kids always ask for help. I always tell my kids, ‘Dream big and always ask for help.’”

Failing in high school can have serious implications than just college or job security. Professor Williams, who is an education activist and author as well as teacher, pointed out that the kids who fall through the cracks in high school are far more likely than their peers to end up in prison. These students are also far more likely to come from low-income, black or Hispanic backgrounds. This feeds into a cycle of poverty and socioeconomic disparity.

Working parents often don’t have time to sit down with teachers. The principals stressed that there are resources available. “Parents: you can reach out to staff if you feel that whatever you’re doing isn’t working, and we will put a team together to help you,” said Smith. “It’s really important that parents access the help that is offered and that they work with children on that help.” Even doing seemingly simple things, like asking kids about their homework or classes can have a huge influence on their school lives.”

OneWorld Progressive Institute’s EDUCATION AGENDA – Building Success Pathways For All Students

Engaging Students Positively In Education and Politics – In this OneWorld program students talk about the importance of teachers showing commitment and interest in students’ learning, and in making education really engaging and challenging to students.

ADDITIONAL PARENT AND TEACHERS RESOURCES TO IMPROVE INVOLVEMENT AND BOOST PARENT/TEACHER COLLABORATION.

  1. https://youtu.be/YUQyi-ROqIg – A Secret Strategy Teachers Can Use to Boost Parent Involvement
  2. Engaging Students Positively In Politics and Education  https://youtu.be/u-XVPAogMXg
  3. Customize learning engage students, textbooks not required | Philip Kovacs, Ph. D. | TEDxHuntsville – TED Talk: https://youtu.be/tXoNA7WhDs8,
  4. https://youtu.be/Rvhb9aoyeZs Prepare Our Kids for Life, Not Standardized Tests | Ted Dintersmith | TEDxFargo
  5. https://youtu.be/woVtj8GH678 What standardized tests don’t measure | Nikki Adeli | TEDxPhiladelphia
  6. https://youtu.be/pcjQmfI2JZ8 Raising Awareness: The Importance of Parental Involvement

Tags: education collaboration, parent advocacy, politics and education,

POSTED COMMENTS:

posted by: Tagan on March 10, 2016  10:36pm

This is an irresponsible article about schools and the parent/teacher relationship as it only approaches it from the schools perspective stating what parents need to do or are not doing. The issue of communication between schools and parents is much more complex than that. There are many parents that are actively trying to communicate with teachers and schools and there are sometimes many barriers that prevent that communication from being productive. One barrier that can happen is that parents have a perspective that the school does not want to hear or understand. Often our schools want parent engagement only when that means parents showing up in the way the schools want them to. For there to be true good communication we need to reframe our schools as communities and teach our school administrators, teachers, students and parents to be community builders and function as a community with listening, collaboration, and respectful communication.

posted by: Jill_the_Pill on March 11, 2016  11:20am

It’s more complicated than it sounds.  High school students have been told by their teachers, “you need to be adult enough now to solve your own problems; don’t get your parents involved!”  And that’s valid as teens prepare to go off to college.

Parents know teachers and administrators are busy, and they don’t want to bother them.  Our teachers are mostly quite good about responding to academic issues promptly, and they will almost always accommodate a request to meet about student performance or behavior.  But, school staff often don’t know what to suggest when parents volunteer to help out.  They are so overwhelmed with responsibilities, the offer of a couple of hours here and there seems more trouble to plan than it is worth.

Parents can’t decide if they are wanted or intruding.  There is always a push-pull message from the school: “parents are so disengaged” but “parents shouldn’t come into the building to wait for their children at dismissal” and “we need to have fewer PTO meetings . . . because parents are so uninvolved.”

As a parent, the thing I have found most discouraging to participation is NHPS’ culture of announcing, canceling, moving, and rescheduling things at the last minute.  Nothing is more frustrating than making room in your schedule to show up to the locked door of a dark building

posted by: MegIfill on March 11, 2016  5:17pm

“This Monday will make a week since I was promised a phone call by the Parent Advocate’s office. How many parents reach out only to have their messages and requests ignored? As a parent I felt the hostility from teachers at SPMT meetings at my son’s old school. Parent hostile environments are not unusual; we’re not the ones with the MA or PhDs.”

OneWorld responds/comments:  The Office of the Parent Advocate, managed by Daniel Diaz, is supposed to respond to parents’ concerns and help parents to navigate the NHPS system, and find the help they need to resolve issues.  If that is not happening, parents should call the office of the Superintendent at Central Office (203) 946-8888 and report it.

posted by: Teachmychildren on March 12, 2016  2:15pm   “I think we do lack Parent involvement..as a parent and advocate getting parents to come out to support their children is a HUGE issue. I know as a parent and grandparent some of us are working two jobs, single family, no transportation, or some lack education. However, it’s imperative that we support our children and make time for them. No excuse!  Some parents would rather be on FB or watch TV and get high rather then visit the school but yet they will make time when their child is be reprimanded.

Also, as an involved parent / grandparent I noticed some of the Administration /Parents / Students being divided. Instead of working together its them against us attitude. My recent experience I’ve observed Administration being dishonest and intimidating the students. I was shocked and disturbed. I understand why perhaps some parents aren’t involved. Administration and Parents are divided and the students are in the middle. I like to see more workshops inviting parents and student among all grades. I think starting at the high school level too late.

I feel as a parent un welcomed into the school when I’m there to advocate for my children. Just imagine if a parent witness an Administrator lying or bullying students what the students are facing on a daily basis. I also witnessed students being very fresh and very disrespectful toward the Administrators and I was disturbed equally!

This is why it’s necessary for all parties such as parents, administrators and students to be on the same team! Communication is seriously lacking and it’s the biggest part of the equation that needs fixing!! I feel parents don’t join the PTA because of this sense of division. Solutions are needed because it’s the kids who are suffering and in the middle!! The Administration will still be there teaching and receiving a pay check and the students where will they be later in life? On public assistance due to a lack education and not knowing how to advocate for themselves. Let’s work together!!”

OneWorld responds/comments: We very much regret that we did not see these comments when the NHI article was posted in March 2016.  It was only this week (Nov. 21, 2016) after someone mentioned the article to us that I looked it up and realized that comments were posted.  We then transferred the article to our Blogs.  We are sorry that we were unaware of the postings and therefore were not able to respond in a timely manner.  We greatly appreciate that the commenters took the time to write and share their perspectives.
N’Zinga Shäni, Executive Director

  • OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc
  • http://www.oneworldpi.org
  • OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do at any given time and on an ongoing basis.  We invite and appreciate technical and financial support.

We at OneWorld invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support. Write to us at: OneWorld, Inc. P.O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531

Read More      No Comments

Political Polarization Challenges City High School Students

OneWorld Progressive Institute OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996. Please visit our YouTube channel to see examples of our work: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6  Civic Engagement, Education and Health Literacy are our main areas of focus.  Visitors can learn much more about OneWorld’s investment in each area by visiting the following links: Education Agenda: http://www.oneworldpi.org/education/ See our Civic Engagement programs and forums at: http://www.oneworldpi.org/civic_engagement/ and Health Literacy can be found at: http://www.oneworldpi.org/health/

  • Our FaceBook page is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others. We are working to contribute positively to the broader Connecticut community.

Here is an article in the New Haven Independent (NHI) about a civic engagement forum done on Nov. 17, 2016 at Citizens television.  Twelve high school students from six schools in Hamden, New Haven and West Haven participated. The topic was:

Political Polarization Challenges City High School Students

Erica Pandey Photo

Students from ESUMS, Hillhouse, West Haven High on the set of OneWorld Progressive Institute’s Political forum at CTV.

Erica Pandey Photo – Student Danayit MeKennon on the set.

For New Haven high-school students, the results of the presidential election came as a shock — because they almost all of the information they heard in the months leading up to it came from left-leaning sources.Now they’re trying to figure out how to adjust to a new reality, and what to do about it.

That theme emerged from a televised panel discussion with 12 high school local students. The discussion took place this past week about “The Effects of Political Polarization,” which was broadcasted live on the “OneWorld Presents” program on Citizens Television. The discussion was organized by producer and OneWorld executive director,  N’Zinga Shäni and facilitated by Capital Community College professor Antoinette Brim and former New Haven Public Schools administrator Marc Palmieri.

The students on the show were asked: What do you want to say to everyone watching tonight?

It’s difficult to find moderate viewpoints in the news and on social media, they said. Many of the students said they felt they were in a bubble this campaign season, hearing only from the left. They said that the election result came as a shock because of this.

But all of the panelists said they hoped to hear from the other side and seek compromise, a tack President Barack Obama and Secretary Hillary Clinton have advocated in speeches after Election Day.

“It’s easy to call people ignorant and racist, but at the end of the day that doesn’t change anything,” said Natalie Cassar, a senior at High School in the Community.

Although they were not eligible to vote in the last presidential election, they will cast ballots supporting progressive policies in the next mid-term elections.

Several students also said they were dissatisfied with the existing political parties. It turns people into one-issue voters, Cassar said.

Rose Silver, a senior at West Haven High School, said one question she has been thinking about is whether it is ethical for people to vote “selfishly” on single issues, such as abortion or gay rights, without considering a given candidate’s other views.

“Are you guys going to be the generation that busts up the two-party system?” Brim asked.

Nelson said that the rise of third-party candidates Jill Stein and Gary Johnson in this election might already indicate the two-party system’s decline.

“This discussion confirmed for me that our generation is ready to make a change,” said Andrew Gordon, a senior at West Haven High School.

Students from ESUMS, Hamden High, West Haven High, MBA and HSC at OneWorld’s Political Polarization television forum at CTV. Sean Nelson is second from left.

Other students stressed the importance of healing before moving on. Sean Nelson, a high school student who is gay and the son of immigrant parents, looked right into a camera and spoke slowly.

“I want [elected officials] to know that we are people,” he said. “If you make policies against the LGBT community, the immigrant community and the Muslim community, we will come together, and we will take those policies down.”
“Politics is personal,” Nelson said. “When someone agrees that our VP-elect is a good choice, that’s personal.”

Vice President-elect Mike Pence is an opponent of gay marriage and has been criticized for supporting conversion therapy.

“It’s really hard to love your country and feel proud of your country if you feel like your country isn’t proud of you back,” said Coral Ortiz, a senior at Hillhouse High School.

“Palmieri said he was impressed with the level of political engagements the panelists demonstrated. He said they are more informed at a young age than generations before them have been.”

Student participants are: Donovan Haynes, Senior, Hamden High.  Melody DeBlasio, MBA (NHPS); Melina Joseph, Sophomore, ESUMS (NHPS);   Danayit Mekennon, Senior, ESUMS; Mama Soumahoro, Senior ESUMS; Andrew Gordon, Senior, West Haven High; Evelyn Fabian, Senior, WHHS;  Rose Silver, Senior, WHHS;   Lily DeBlasio, Senior, HSC;  Natalie Cassar, Senior, HSC;  Coral Ortiz, Senior, Hillhouse High and Sean Nelson, Junior, HSC.     OneWorld is grateful to all who helped to make this program possible.     

In the past 20 plus years OneWorld has been engaging a cross-section of students from Hamden, New Haven and West Haven in a range of critical-thinking activities.  We would like to do more, but it is not always easy to get the support we need.  As volunteers we need a great deal of technical and financial support to get these programs recorded, edited, and distributed to the 8 stations that currently air our programs. By visiting our YouTube channel visitors can see segments of past programs. Here are links to some recent compelling forums with students from the three towns we serve directly:  In this forum students discuss the importance of having committed teachers and students feeling engaged: https://youtu.be/u-XVPAogMXg  One student said teachers need more flexibility to apply their own experiences to engage students effectively. They should teach less to the test and more to what is practical for students to learn and be prepared for their future.

In this other program done several years ago, college students also tackled Political Polarization and its detrimental effects on our society: https://youtu.be/8x-yF7QvDFg   The comparisons in students’ perspectives are uncanny.  We invite you to watch and listen to both short video segments.  The more recent group has not seen the earlier video. One group is made up of high school students; the other of college students.  OneWorld  welcomes your comments.

POLITICS, POLARIZATION AND EDUCATION, THEN & NOW

Remarkably, we filmed two programs on the same topic 9 years apart.

  • One program was with college students from Yale and Dartmouth
  • The newer program is with high school students from NHPS and WHHS.
  • The students’ perspectives are remarkably similar and with shared concerns.
  • Something is going on in our public schools that needs to be re-evaluated.Why are so many teachers opting out?
  • https://youtu.be/8x-yF7QvDFg?t=9

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do at any given time and on an ongoing basis.  We invite and appreciate technical and financial support.

We at OneWorld invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support. Write to us at: OneWorld, Inc. P.O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531

Read More      No Comments

Sexual Harassment Persists In Politics, Business, Everywhere

OneWorld Progressive InstituteOneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996. Please visit our YouTube channel to see examples of our work: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6  Civic Engagement, Education and Health Literacy are our main areas of focus.  Visitors can learn much more about OneWorld’s investment in each area by visiting the following links:  http://www.oneworldpi.org/civic_engagement/ 

In many areas of life in America sexual harassment is standard practice. It is standard in places we might least expect such as churches and schools. Although in 2016 it is less standard practice than it was when Professor Anita Hill brought it out in the open in Oct. 1991, it is still a constant in the lives of many, and particularly women.  It is even more so in the lives of women who are trying to advance in their careers, and women in careers where they are dependent on men for advancement.  It’s egregiously so for women of color, and more often those who are working for men of color.  We have a perfect example in the Anita Hill and Clarence Thomas situation.  Many black women were angry with Hill.

There is an unwritten rule that she dares not turn him in; she dares not speak out against him.  That will be treacherous; she would be destroying the career of one of her own.  Many in the community might turn against her. She is a traitor to her own kind. In fact, when this happens to young women, some of the older women will be openly hostile towards her.  They might accuse her of lying to advance herself.  This is not because they believe she is lying, but they think she must take one for team. This is often true whether the woman is black, Latina, Asian or belong to some other minority group.  It’s an unwritten but well understood code. If she goes above the head of her abuser (to the authorities) she might certainly find herself abandoned by the majority of the men and many of the older women.  She can no longer be trusted. Any hopes she had for advancement is now dashed. Examine the response of people such as Bill O’Reilly to the women at Fox News who complained about Roger Ailes.

In the case of Anita Hill, Thomas used his color as a cover.  He claimed he was going through a high tech lynching.  Anita Hill is the one who ended up being lynched, technically. The all white all male judiciary panel dismissed her charges and confirmed Clarence Thomas; he sits on the Supreme Court today.  And according to newer reports he has not completely changed his behavior.  Recently an Alaska lawyer accused him of groping her at a party in 1999.  This is as a sitting justice on the Supreme Court.  Powerful men are very confident that they can get away with sexually harassing women because their power sets them free. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/anita-hill-matters-hbo-confirmation_us_570fb8f9e4b0ffa5937e5e72

These are the reasons many women suffer sexual harassment and career abuse for years. This is why after so many decades of this debilitating and corrosive behavior being brought to the forefront, it continues at places such as Fox News and many other organizations; it continues in politics. Women know that even among those who claim to oppose such behavior, sadly, even including some women, it goes on under their noses because their careers come first.  Some even enable through collusion, or a blind eye.  Sexual Harassment is a malaise in our society; it is a hindrance in every aspect of life for many; it has stifled or killed the careers of many women and some men. The words used to describe women who complain often serve to prevent them from getting good jobs anywhere: they are sick, greedy, vindictive, and a whole lot more. The tables are turned.

In order to be believed it is important to do what Gretchen Carlson did; she recorded some of her encounters with Roger Ailes.  Women need irrefutable evidence.  Read about that here: The Revenge of Roger’s Angels  –How Fox News women took down the most powerful, and predatory, man in media. By http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2016/09/how-fox-news-women-took-down-roger-ailes.html

We encourage women, in particular, to read the article linked below.  You will learn how commonplace and blatant sexual abuse is in politics; the Republican House Majority Whip was found to have had sex with some 22 women while in office; even in his legislative office and his home! He quietly resigned in 2015. Powerful men in the US Congress still sexually abuse interns and harass women.  It’s imperative that women of all ages fight back by documenting (preferably recording) the conduct; after having all supporting facts, find strong allies and file complaints.

“Why Sexual Harassment Persists in Politics”

Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri, center, in April. “There’s an insular atmosphere,” she said of the world of politics, “and people get heady with power.” Credit Drew Angerer for The New York Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WASHINGTON — Senator Claire McCaskill, Democrat of Missouri, got her first tutorial about life as a woman in politics as a college intern at the statehouse in Jefferson City in 1974, when male lawmakers made lecherous remarks to her in the elevator; she took the stairs after that. When she became a state legislator in 1983, the lessons became more explicit when she asked the House speaker on the dais his advice for getting legislation passed.

“Claire,” she recalls his saying in a tone-deaf attempt at humor, “did you bring your kneepads?”

So “you can imagine how depressed I was,” the 63-year-old senator said the other day, recalling her reaction to news that a top Democrat in the Missouri General Assembly had sent explicit late-night texts to interns and that the Republican speaker of the Missouri House had exchanged “sexually charged texts” with a 19-year-old intern. Both men resigned last year.

It has been 25 years since Anita Hill testified against Clarence Thomas before an all-male Senate Judiciary Committee, and propelled the term sexual harassment into the national spotlight. Once again, the nation is debating gender roles, amid a presidential campaign that features a woman, Hillary Clinton, who stands a chance of becoming America’s first female president, against a man, Donald J. Trump, who has been caught on a recording bragging about kissing and groping women whenever he wanted.

Across America, women are increasingly emboldened to discuss the harassment they experienced. Last week, an Alaska lawyer accused Justice Thomas of groping her at a dinner party in 1999; he has denied the claim as “preposterous,” as he did after the charges made in 1991 by Ms. Hill, who is now a Brandeis University professor. Since the release of the Trump recording, more than 10 women have accused the candidate of groping them — accusations that he too has denied.

But in this tumbling forth, there is another little-noticed truth: Politics and legislatures, like many other environments, remain rife with sexual harassment — and young people, including men, are particularly at risk, and still reluctant to speak out.

In Tennessee, the House majority whip, Jeremy Durham, a Republican, was expelled in September after an investigation by the state attorney general uncovered “sexual interactions” with 22 women. They included a 20-year-old “college student/political worker” with whom the report says he had sex in his legislative office and at his home. None filed official complaints of harassment; the scrutiny came in response to investigative reporting by The Nashville Tennessean. Mr. Durham has denied wrongdoing, calling the reports “anonymous hearsay.”

In Texas, the journalist Olivia Messer, writing in The Texas Observer in 2013, described a culture of “senators ogling women on the Senate floor, or watching porn on iPads and on state-owned computers.” In South Carolina, a 69-year-old Republican state lawmaker stepped down in April, amid allegations that he had harassed a House page.

Experts in employment law and advocates of women’s rights say there are particular reasons that harassment can flourish in politics. At its core, sexual harassment is about power, and politics is the ultimate power profession. It draws in young people who are eager to advance and reluctant to make waves. And political organizations rise and fall around the fortunes of one central figure, a hierarchy that discourages reporting of harassment, because if the boss gets in trouble, everyone’s job is at risk.

Taylor Hirth said she received racy text messages from State Senator Paul LeVota of Missouri when she was his intern in 2010. Mr. LeVota, who resigned, denied any wrongdoing. Credit Christopher Smith for The New York Times

“There’s an insular atmosphere, and people get heady with power,” Ms. McCaskill said. “When people are deferential to you for your position, I don’t think it helps.”

(The senator, who has often detailed her accounts of being a woman in a male-dominated political world, first told the knee-pad story in her 2015 memoir, “Plenty Ladylike.” The legislator, Bob Griffin, Missouri’s longest-serving House speaker, could not be reached for comment, and has never publicly responded to it.)

Taylor Hirth, 31, said she remained silent when State Senator Paul LeVota of Missouri, a former House Democratic leader, sent what she described as racy text messages inviting her to have drinks with him when she was his intern in 2010. “I make it a point not to drink alone with married men,” she wrote back to him. She said that the missives ultimately stopped, but that Mr. LeVota — who denied any wrongdoing when he stepped down — shunned her in the office afterward, denying her assignments.

She decided not to file a complaint. But when some of his other interns did complain, in 2014, they went not to state officials, but to their school, the University of Central Missouri.

The university opened an investigation under Title IX, the federal anti-discrimination law. The State Senate later hired an outside lawyer to investigate.

Then, in debating how to discourage harassment, some Missouri lawmakers proposed a new dress code for interns. Ms. McCaskill was furious. The new speaker rejected the plan.

Experts say employees of large private companies — and those in federal agencies — tend to have stronger protections than those who work in legislatures, and are afforded better training about harassment. In a recent study, the National Conference on State Legislatures asked its members if discussion of sexual harassment laws and policies was included in orientations for new lawmakers. Of 48 legislative chambers that responded, only 28 said yes.

Here in Washington, Congress has set standards for itself that are different from — and less stringent than — those it established for federal agencies. While the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission requires federal agencies to conduct training and post policies regarding workplace sexual harassment, the commission does not have jurisdiction over Capitol Hill.

Instead, harassment complaints are handled by the little-known Office of Compliance. The office was created in 1995 after some high-profile cases — including that of Senator Bob Packwood of Oregon, a Republican who was accused of making unwanted advances toward women — raised questions about why Congress was exempt.

The office has no authority to require workplace training. It has developed a voluntary program, but “not all members take advantage of it,” said Paula Sumberg, a deputy executive director of the office.

Representative Ann McLane Kuster at a rally for Hillary Clinton in New Hampshire last month. Ms. Kuster spoke out in the House in June about her experiences of sexual harassment. Credit Doug Mills/The New York Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When Emily Martin, the general counsel of the National Women’s Law Center in Washington, gave a talk to Capitol Hill aides, she said many raised questions about harassment and had no idea how to file a complaint. “There was the sense that it was just sort of the Wild West out there and they were on their own,” she said.

Congressional employees must undergo confidential mediation before their harassment complaints can go forward, “and the victim can face serious sanctions if they discuss it,” said Debra Katz, an employment lawyer. That restriction does not apply to other federal workers, she said. Ms. Katz represented young men who accused former Representative Eric J. Massa of New York, a Democrat who resigned in 2010, of harassment.

Women who have spent their professional careers in and around politics and legislative life know that the danger at 30 is not what it is at 20. They also acquire a kind of radar — some state lobbyists said they know which lawmakers not to visit alone — and develop a set of defenses, said Julie Mason, host of “The Press Pool” on Sirius XM radio.

“If you can’t handle this, you can’t cover politics,” Ms. Mason recalls her editor telling her when she was a reporter in Texas 25 years ago and she came to him in tears over politicians’ lewd gestures and remarks. So she toughened up, she said, and advises other women to do the same.

Much, of course, has changed here and around the country since the days when Senator Strom Thurmond, the South Carolina Republican who served until he was 100, was accused of trying to grope Senator Patty Murray, Democrat of Washington, in an elevator shortly after she took office in 1993.

Today, some men in Congress refuse to be alone with a woman when the door is closed, to avoid even the appearance of impropriety. Even before the Trump recording led to a new hashtag on Twitter — #NotOkay — women in politics were coming forward to tell their stories.

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, Democrat of New York, wrote in her 2014 book about a male colleague in the Senate who pinched her waist and told her, “I like my girls chubby!” Ms. Gillibrand did not reveal his name.

Representative Ann McLane Kuster, Democrat of New Hampshire, kept silent for nearly 40 years: “My husband didn’t know, my children didn’t know,” she said. But she spoke out in June, on the floor of the House, about her own experiences, including the time a “distinguished guest” of Congress stuck his hand up her skirt when she was a 23-year-old aide on Capitol Hill.

It happened at a fancy lunch; her congressman boss was seated next to her, and had no idea. She was motivated to tell her story by something that happened outside politics: a rape at Stanford University.

Many women in politics say the culture will not change until there are more women around — and that is happening, albeit slowly. Today, women account for roughly 19 percent of Congress: There are 20 women in the Senate and 84 in the House. Ms. McCaskill’s chief of staff is a woman, as is her legislative director.

“I think that gives a signal to other young women,” she said. “It helps to have a woman in charge.”

Related Coverage

  1. Lawyer Accuses Justice Thomas of Groping Her at Party in 1999

WASHINGTON — An Alaska lawyer has accused Justice Clarence Thomas of groping her at a dinner party in 1999, a claim that Justice Thomas called “preposterous.”

The lawyer, Moira Smith, who was a 23-year-old Truman Foundation scholar at the time, told The National Law Journal that Justice Thomas had “sort of cupped his hand around my butt and pulled me pretty close to him” as she was making final preparations for the party, in a Washington suburb.

Justice Thomas, continuing to squeeze her buttocks, urged her to sit next to him at the dinner, Ms. Smith said. She declined. He asked if she was sure, Ms. Smith recalled. “I said yes, and that was the end of it,” she said.

Through a court spokeswoman, Justice Thomas told The National Law Journal that the episode “never happened.” The spokeswoman, Kathleen L. Arberg, said she had nothing to add to that statement.

Justice Thomas, 68, took his seat on the court 25 years ago after a searing confirmation battle that also featured accusations of sexual harassment.

Ms. Smith, who is now general counsel of Enstar Natural Gas, declined a request for an interview. But in a statement, she said that while she had felt powerless at the time of the groping, “17 years later, it is clear that sexual harassment, misconduct and assault continue to be pervasive, having an impact on all women.” She added, “I choose to speak out now in the hope that this will change.”   http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/28/us/politics/lawyer-accuses-justice-thomas-of-groping-her-at-party-in-1999.html?

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do at any given time and on an ongoing basis.  We invite and appreciate technical and financial support.

We at OneWorld invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support. Write to us at: OneWorld, Inc. P.O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531

Read More      No Comments

Gwen Ifill, A Loss To Professional Journalism & To Humanity

OneWorld Progressive Institute OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996. Please visit our YouTube channel to see examples of our work: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6  Civic Engagement, Education and Health Literacy are our main areas of focus.  Visitors can learn much more about OneWorld’s investment in each area by visiting the following links:  http://www.oneworldpi.org/health/

GWEN IFILL, THE PBS-BASED JOURNALIST, DIED ON MONDAY, NOV. 14, 2016.  Gwen Ifill, a journalist to her core, who served as the PBS NewsHour’s co-anchor and managing editor and, in her own words, sought to always “tell the stories that shed light and spur action,” has died from complications of cancer. She was 61.”

Clearly, Gwen Ifill was not seeking to be rich; after all, she worked at PBS.  But that is not the only thing that sets her apart as a journalist.  She cared about being an excellent journalist and she practiced her craft where the emphasis was on telling the story and not on flash, dash and ratings. Gwen was focused, thoughtful, and committed. She was a hard worker; she was disciplined and she was always principled. I had great respect and admiration for her.  N’Zinga Shäni, OneWorld, Inc

“Gwen covered eight presidential campaigns, moderated two vice-presidential debates and served for 17 years on the NewsHour and as moderator and managing editor of “Washington Week.” In her early career, she covered politics and city hall for some of the country’s most prominent newspapers, including the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Baltimore Evening Sun, carving a path as one of the most accomplished journalists in U.S. media. She won countless awards, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the National Press Club’s Fourth Estate Award, and was the best-selling author of “The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama.”

Gwen’s death has left her colleagues devastated.

“She was a standard bearer for courage, fairness and integrity in an industry going through seismic change,” said the NewsHour’s executive producer, Sara Just. “She was a mentor to so many across the industry — a journalist’s journalist who set an example for all around her.”

And from her co-anchor, Judy Woodruff: “She was not only my dear friend, she was the best partner one can imagine, because she was committed to fairness and to the finest in journalism. You always knew when working with Gwen that she had your back. I’m crushed that she won’t be sitting by my side on the NewsHour any more, but her mark on this program and on American journalism will endure.”

The Life and Example of Gwen Ifill

 By David Brooks

Smartphones change death. When I heard that Gwen Ifill had died on Monday I pulled out my phone and scrolled through the photo album.

There were pictures of Gwen and her “NewsHour” colleague Judy Woodruff laughing uproariously together, doing little exploding fist-bumps, which I sneakily took while she was heroically covering the political conventions this year.

There was a picture of her joyously driving a boat full tilt during a “NewsHour” party a few summers ago, the wind blasting into her clothes and face. There were pictures of her posing with friends of mine who had come to visit the set. Everybody who came wanted a picture with Gwen.

Every reminiscence you read about Gwen will describe her smile. It was not subtle. It shone from her face like some sort of spiritual explosion.

Once, during a walk through Rock Creek Park, she told me that if she didn’t go to church on Sunday she felt a little flatter for the whole week. A spirit as deep and ebullient as hers needed nourishment and care, and when it came out it came out in her smile, which was totalistic and unrestrained.

Gwen Ifill arriving, with Wendell Pierce, for a state dinner at the White House. Credit Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

Gwen worked in a tough business, and being an African-American woman in that business brought its own hardships and scars, but Gwen’s smile did not hold back. Her whole personality was the opposite of reticent, and timidity was a stranger to her. When the Ifill incandescence came at you, you were getting human connection full-bore.

And you had better honor it. After the photos, I searched Monday through our email exchanges. I don’t know how Gwen was with her other friends, but she’d send me short, sometimes cryptic emails every couple of weeks. Sometimes it was a compliment, sometimes a bit of gossip, sometimes it was a jokey offer to rub out someone who’d been nasty to me, and sometimes she was just the sort of friend who checks in: “For some reason you have been on my mind. Are you well?”

Gwen was ebullient, as I’ve mentioned, but she was not soft. She was authoritative, an executive and confident.

I suppose every profession has a few people like this, people who love the whole profession, who pay compliments when its standards are met and who are tough when they are not. Gwen talked a lot about her extended family, but also a lot about newsrooms and who were the great colleagues in them.

I would say she was an ambitious person. She liked moderating the big debates, even though she was a bundle of nerves just before. But she was not ambitious the way some other TV people are. Gwen was adored wherever she went, but she let the adoration roll off her, without it affecting her understanding of what was real.

She was ambitious for quality. She worked for low money at PBS. She worked doggedly on her programs, and whenever I did anything that diminished the “NewsHour” she let me know directly.

She loved her country, too. She relentlessly promoted female and African-American journalists. She had a strong affinity for badass women of all types. She kept her journalistic distance from the Obamas, but she knew what a step it was to have an African-American president.

The night before Obama’s inauguration in 2009, a group of journalists met in David and Katherine Bradley’s house. At the end of the evening they gathered around the piano and sang civil rights anthems and some hymns. Everybody knew the first stanza to “Amazing Grace,” but only Gwen knew the last three, which she sang alone, in honor of the past labors and future promise.

By 2012 she sensed that racial ugliness was coming out into the open. She began getting more racist reactions on social media and she moved to support her friend Jeffrey Goldberg of The Atlantic, who was getting anti-Semitic ones. Keep your head down and keep writing, she urged Goldberg; it’s what they don’t want you to do. Gwen knew what was coming.

These days it is normal to bash Washington, to want to “drain the swamp” and to attack the mainstream media. The populists are in and the establishment is out.

But I confess, when I looked at the front of The Times website on Monday and saw a photo of Stephen K. Bannon, on leave from Breitbart as chairman and rising in power, and then underneath it a photo of Gwen, who is passing from this world, I wanted to throw up. This is not progress and this is not good news.

Gwen’s death merits a bit of the reaction that greeted the death of the writer Samuel Johnson centuries ago: She has left a chasm, which nobody else can fill up and which nobody has a tendency to fill.

Now that Gwen is dead, who is the next best thing? There’s nobody. There are many great people who will follow her example. But nobody quite reminds you of Gwen.”

Importance of Pap Smears, HPV tests and Cervical & Uterine Cancer Screenings.

Cervical and Uterine cancers are not well understood. As best the medical community can tell us, that information is provided in this 9 mins segment of a OneWorld education video with Yale Oncologist, Dr. Thomas Rutherford. Getting regular Pap Smears, GYN exam and HPV screenings are the best there is for early diagnosis.  Age, weight and genetics are the best known risk factors for black women.  White women get uterine cancer more than black women;  genetics is key. 

Of course, women should confer with their doctors for the latest information.  Women should also learn their medical family history as thoroughly as possible.  Learn more by visiting:  http://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/uterine-cancer/risk-factors-and-prevention  

The Grace of Gwen Ifill

Those of us who worked even briefly with the journalist Gwen Ifill, who died on Monday at the age of 61, can attest to her deeply held sense of fairness, the preternatural grace she showed under pressure and the way she kept her composure in the face of both personal and professional slights that would have left many of us breathing fire and brimstone.

The story that best captures that composure — one she told often and utterly without rancor — dates back to the 1970s and her first summer job, in the photo department of the hard-edged and very white Boston Herald American. The newsroom had never seen anything like her — a college-educated black woman who aspired to journalism — and her presence was made all the more striking by the fact that nearby South Boston was embroiled in an angry rebellion over school busing that had captured national attention.

Gwen came to work one day to find a note in her work space that read “Nigger, go home.” As the sheltered daughter of a minister, she’d had little experience with naked bigotry and at first wondered whom the note might be for.

As she told The Washington Post decades later, she realized that the person who wrote it — a man approaching retirement — had done a terrible thing, but she viewed the transgression with sadness and did not want him fired. The insult itself did not feel at all personal, and could therefore not reach or harm her.

The paper offered her a job, which she did not at first accept. But after she graduated from college, employment opportunities were few and she changed her mind. Years later when giving advice to the young, she would sometimes say that it doesn’t matter how you get the job, only that you “bring it” — and prove the skeptics wrong — once you get a foot in the door.

Thus began a remarkable career that took her through high-profile newspapers like The Baltimore Evening Sun, The Washington Post and The New York Times, where she became a White House correspondent. After a stint at NBC, she landed at PBS, where she achieved national visibility as moderator and managing editor of the public affairs program “Washington Week” and as co-anchor and co-managing editor, with Judy Woodruff, of the “PBS NewsHour.”

No matter how high she rose, whenever she felt blocked or underestimated, she moved on to new places where she felt her value recognized. She phrased it best a decade ago, when she told the graduates at Emerson College in Boston that as a black woman in journalism, she had spent her entire career proving people wrong.”

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/remembering-gwen/

PBS NewsHour

November 15, 2016
The news of Gwen Ifill’s death has left a void in the world of journalism and politics. Judy Woodruff and Hari Sreenivasan speak with a few of her friends and colleagues about her legacy and what made her so beloved.

John Dickerson | Slate

November 15, 2016
Gwen’s smile. It was so strong it greeted you before you met her. You could read by the light of her smile. And if you could make her laugh that was a prize. The sound of pure joy.

Pete Williams | MSNBC – November 15, 2016

“PBS anchor Gwen Ifill, one of the most prominent journalists in the country, has passed away at the age of 61. NBC’s Pete Williams reports.”
 
It is so important that we tell people that we value them while they are with us; it is highly beneficial that we take the time to communicate with each other.  Let’s provide joy in the lives of those we care about as best we can. N’Zinga Shäni

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3, 100 percent volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996.  We produce three categories of television programs: health literacy, education and civic engagement. We also engage the community, and particularly students, in critical-thinking forums, an oratory competition and radio discussions. What we do depends largely on what we can financially afford to do at any given time and on an ongoing basis.  We invite and appreciate technical and financial support.

We at OneWorld invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  We welcome financial and technical support. Write to us at: OneWorld, Inc. P.O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531

Read More      No Comments