Education: Ranking the Best High Schools in CT for 2016

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc has culled the highlights of the ranking of CONNECTICUT HIGH SCHOOLS (PUBLIC & PRIVATE) FOR 2016 and listed it all here.

By choosing the vehicle used in this blog, we are not expressing agreement with it. We do find it most convenient and comprehensive. We also think it allows for a starting point.  There are various ranking systems used; checking some of the others, we find this one to be quite specific about its methodolgy, and the classifications are clear. 

Whether one agrees with the rankings listed for all types of schools in Connecticut or not, we believe it is beneficial for several reasons; among them are:

  1. It provides a set of standards that parents, teachers, legislators and community leaders can use to evaluate foundational education overall;
  2. It helps those responsible to ask relevant questions and to make informed decisions.
  3. The ranking list the top 100 in each category, or as many as there are if less than 100;
  4. Also, the national list is helpful; it provides an opportunity to look at CT versus other states.

According to the report, the rankings are based on: “statistics, student and parent reviews, and expert insights. Ranking factors include state test scores, college readiness, graduation rates, SAT/ACT scores, teacher quality, student and parent reviews, and more.” 

In addition to the Best Private High Schools, there are rankings in the categories listed below:  

2016 Best Private High Schools in Connecticut

There are 58 PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS RANKED IN CT. HOPKINS (located in NH) is ranked #3; CHOATE (located in Wallingford) is ranked #1, and HOTCHKISS SCHOOL (Salisbury Town) is ranked #2. Hamden Hall Country Day School (in Hamden) is ranked #21.  See more details here: https://k12.niche.com/rankings/private-high-schools/best-overall/s/connecticut/

 100 TOP-RANKING PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS IN CT FOR 2016

Top three ranked public high schools are: Staples High (Westport), New Canaan High and Wilton High. The top ranked high school in the NHPS system is ESUMS High ranked at #20 in the top 100. Amity Regional is ranked at #10.  New Haven’s Cooperative Arts High is ranked #52. North Haven High is ranked #62. NH’s Hill Regional Career is ranked #72 and Common Ground is ranked #76. No other NHPS is ranked in the top 100.

There are not enough graded Public Charter High Schools in this region to display a ranked list. There are no Connecticut Charter High Schools among the top 100 schools nationally. You may search a different region or review the Charter High Schools national ranking here.

2016: Best Magnet High Schools in Connecticut – 26 Schools Are Ranked

NHPS have done well among the state’s 26 ranked Magnet Schools

2016: Best Charter High Schools in America

Connecticut has no Charter schools ranked in the top 100 nationwide. Ranked #1 nationally is: Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science & Technology Lawrenceville Township, GA

2016: Best School Districts in Connecticut (Only Top 100 Are Ranked)

Explore the best school districts in your area based on statistics, student and parent reviews, and expert insights. Ranking factors include: state test scores, college readiness, graduation rates, SAT/ACT scores, teacher quality, student and parent reviews, and more. Hamden, New Haven and West Haven did not place in the top 100. Amity ranked #11, Branford #41 & No. Haven #48.  See how this ranking was calculated.

2016: Best School Districts Ranking Methodology

The 2016 Best School Districts ranking provides a comprehensive assessment of the overall experience of a school district.  This grade takes into account key factors such as the strength of academics, quality of teachers, school resources, the quality of student life, as well as student and parent reviews, in an attempt to measure the overall excellence of the district. For CT school districts: Westport is ranked #1 and Vernon is ranked #100. Amity is #11, North Haven is #48 and Hamden is #81.

“At the time of calculation, our database contained records for 12,153 school districts. School districts were not included in the ranking process if they did not have sufficient data. For more details about how we compute our rankings click here.

https://k12.niche.com/rankings/public-school-districts/best-overall/s/connecticut/

On March 3, 2016, CT Mirror published an article titled: State releases grades for every school: http://ctmirror.org/2016/03/03/state-releases-grades-for-every-school/

ESUMS New Haven Public Schools’ Engineering and Science University Magnet School (ESUMS) has consistently been one of the highest ranking public high schools and magnet schools in Connecticut.  In this ranking it is #20 among high schools, and #3 among magnet schools. We congratulate the staff,  parents and students at ESUMS, and hope that their ranking will continue to climb.  Below is a link to an informative video program with the principals of some of New Haven Public Schools (NHPS) unique magnet school program recorded a few years ago: https://youtu.be/dc88PGh2APY  Visitors can watch the entire program on YouTube.

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc produces television programs and community forums on Education. We invite visitors to our YouTube channel and to our FaceBook page.  If you like what you see, please also “like” OneWorld’s FaceBook page. We welcome financial and technical support for our work.  Please write to us at: OneWorld, Inc. P. O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531 or to: nzingashanis@gmail.com

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NY Times Newsletter Exploring Race: Engaging & Provocative

OneWorld Progressive Institute

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3 volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996. We welcome your financial and technical support.

The New York Times has embarked upon a civilized, informative, engaging and provocative project that we at OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc., hope will continue for some time.  Importantly, we hope that many people will subscribe to the Newsletter and that other forums will develop at the local levels in various communities.  This can only be helpful.  America needs this in 2016, especially as we see the multi-pronged head of racism flourishing in many ways and under numerous guises.  We encourage you, our reader, to share this widely.  This chapter of the Newsletter is a solid bit of education.  We hope you will make the time to read it.

“In this issue of Race/Related: A Million Questions From Descendants of Georgetown’s Slaves.” The stories are truly engaging and highly informative.  They will help us to better understand many aspects of the American society.  You can find past issues and get signed up for future issues at these links: A newsletter exploring race with provocative reporting and discussion. “See our latest issue or share your stories.”

Join us as we examine how race is experienced today. “Can police bodycams really fix policing?”

“It’s in America’s DNA to be ‘divisive.’”

We want to stir up conversation, with The Times and with you. Because race matters and it’s time to listen. Share your questions and stories.

  • How race is experienced in America today depends largely upon some key factors: #1: one’s easily identifiable or perceived race;
  • #2: gender; #3: socio-economic class and education, and #4: where in the country one lives.
  • While numbers 2 through 4 might vary somewhat, we think number one is a constant throughout America.
  • How do we– as a nation– honestly address this? In fact, is there a desire and a willingness among our political and community leaders to effectively address it?
  • How many of you, as readers, think this is important and that it’s time that we, as a nation, make genuine efforts to make a positive difference where racial issues are concerned? 

Can each of us see how we are affected by the underlying bigotry in America?  This is true whether we are exponents or opponents, conscious or latent in our behaviors.

Here are synopses from some of the powerful stories being told by this remarkable group of people affiliated with this NY Times Race-Related Newsletter:

The great-grandfather of Rochell Sanders Prater was a slave sold by Jesuit priests to help keep Georgetown University afloat. She shared family photos, including one of her grandmother’s house. Her father is in the photo at right, wearing glasses.” Andrew Spear for The New York Times. 

“African Americans have long lived with unanswered questions about their roots, holes in their family trees and stubborn silences from elders reluctant to delve into a painful past rooted in slavery. This month, scores of black readers wrote to us, saying they had finally found clues in a most unlikely place: An article published in The New York Times”

“The story I wrote described the sale of 272 enslaved African Americans in 1838. The men, women and children were owned by the nation’s most prominent Jesuit priests. And they were sold – for about $3.3 million in today’s dollars – to help the college now known as Georgetown University stay afloat.”

Learning about this, how do you think Georgetown University should address this today? Should it be addressed at all, or should it be left in the distant past?

Here is a response from one African American: “I read The New York Times and I saw the story there. I saw the photo of the cemetery, and I saw Maringouin, La. I went to the website of Georgetown’s slavery archive and saw the names of my relatives.” Wow! What impact do you think this experience might have on this person? How do you think it might have affected you? Sandra Green Thomas, age 54, is the Great-great-granddaughter of Sam Harris and Betsy Ware Harris.

“I am still processing it. I find it somewhat comforting and amazing that the immediate family remained intact after being sold. But there’s some sadness, too. When I first read it, I was just looking at the facts. But when you start thinking about it, it is really horrific.”

Please remember, we want to stir up meaningful, and thoughtful conversation, with The Times and with you our readers. Because race matters and it’s time to listen. Share your questions and stories with each other.  Encourage respectful and informative forums in your community.

Here is a link to the April 17, 2016 Race/Related Newsletter: http://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/2016/04/17/race-related?  

OneWorld  Progressive Institute, Inc., is a very small group of committed volunteers who work to bring the greater New Haven community information on health literacy, education and civic engagement.  We ask for your support (technical and financial) and we invite you to visit our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  Thanks again. We hope you will “Like” our work and please visit us at:  www.oneworldpi.org/  Thank you for visiting. Check out this OneWorld YouTube video about how racism is reflected even within the black community: https://youtu.be/8r1OK5Comt8

Thank you for visiting; please, share us with others.  On June 3, 2016, OneWorld will celebrate 20 years of service to the Greater New Haven community.  We ask for your support.  Tax deductible contributions can be made to: OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc. Mail to: OneWorld, Inc. P O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531. http://www.oneworldpi.org/

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Jamaican-Born Medical Pioneer, Dr. Yvette Francis, Died at 89

OneWorld Progressive Institute

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3 volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996. We welcome your financial and technical support.

Here is someone about whom every child (and particularly, black children) should learn for a list of obvious reasons. Some reasons are listed below.

Yvette Fay Francis was born in Kingston, Jamaica, on May 10, 1926. Her father, Clarence, a teacher in Jamaica, became a factory worker when he moved to New York and then a delegate for the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union. Her mother, Sarah Francis, who had also been a teacher, became a seamstress. Yvette attended Hunter College High School in Manhattan. Many people came to the United States in the 20th century (and they still come) for greater educational and financial opportunities. Of course, as black people they paid a price; we call it a trade-off. Her parents, both teachers in Jamaica, became factory workers in America, but leaving British-ruled Jamaica, their children had a wider range of educational opportunities in England, USA and Canada.  The most common claim and belief was that people earned more money in the USA. The other side of that claim that had to be addressed and decided upon is — at what price? Much depended upon the time families arrived in the USA and where they settled. Dr. Yvette’s parents settled in New York state; they paid a price, and she made the best use of their sacrifice.  It’s a valuable lesson to share with our children in 2016.

Dr. Yvette Fay Francis-McBarnette, was a medical pioneer in treating children with Sickle Cell Anemia.  She died on March 28 in Alexandria, Va. She was 89.

  • Her death was confirmed by her daughter Elayne Sara McBarnette.
  • Dr. Francis, as she was known professionally, was a high achiever from the time she was a teenager, after immigrating with her parents to New York City from Jamaica, West Indies.
  • Raised in Harlem, she enrolled in Hunter College when she was 14, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in physics in three and a half years.
  • Deemed too young for medical school or even a laboratory job, she earned a master’s degree in chemistry from Columbia University instead.
  • In 1946, when she was 19, she became the second black woman to enroll at the Yale School of Medicine.

“While directing a clinic at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center in Queens, Dr. Francis was credited with successfully using antibiotics to treat children with sickle cell anemia 15 years before the effectiveness of those drugs was confirmed, in a 1993 article in The New England Journal of Medicine.

“Raised in Harlem, she enrolled in Hunter College when she was 14, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in physics in three and a half years. Deemed too young for medical school or even a laboratory job, she earned a master’s degree in chemistry from Columbia University instead. In 1946, when she was 19, she became the second black woman to enroll at the Yale School of Medicine.

While directing a clinic at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center in Queens, Dr. Francis was credited with successfully using antibiotics to treat children with sickle cell anemia 15 years before the effectiveness of those drugs was confirmed, in a 1993 article in The New England Journal of Medicine.

During the administration of President Richard M. Nixon, Dr. Francis was named to a White House advisory committee, whose recommendations led to the 1972 National Sickle Cell Anemia Control Act, which appropriated federal funds for screening, counseling, health education and research.

Sickle cell anemia, a genetic disorder that affects primarily blacks and people of Mediterranean origin, produces blood cells that, because they are rigid and shaped like sickles or crescents, clog capillaries and deprive tissues of blood and oxygen. It can lead to organ damage, stroke, blindness, severe pain and death. There is still no cure, except through stem-cell transplants in some cases, but effective treatments can mitigate pain and prolong life.

In 1966, while Dr. Francis was in private practice and an attending pediatrician at Jamaica Hospital, she and several colleagues established a foundation to conduct research into the disease.

By 1970, five years before New York State mandated that infants be tested for it, her clinic had already screened 20,000 children and begun prescribing antibiotics.

“Dr. Francis was also urging treatment by then to allow victims of the disease “to pursue their education, earn a living and rear their families” in an era when many sickle cell patients did not survive to adolescence.”

“One patient who followed Dr. Francis’ advice from childhood, Cassandra Dobson, had children, earned her doctorate in nursing and now teaches at Lehman College in the Bronx.

“I stayed on antibiotics for 35 years,” Professor Dobson said in an interview in 2011 with the journal Yale Medicine, published by the university’s medical school. “If I hadn’t, I would’ve died. I was told I was going to die at 5, at 10, at every milestone of my life.”

Yvette Fay Francis was born in Kingston, Jamaica, on May 10, 1926. Her father, Clarence, a teacher in Jamaica, became a factory worker when he moved to New York and then a delegate for the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union. Her mother, Sarah Francis, who had also been a teacher, became a seamstress. Yvette attended Hunter College High School in Manhattan.  (This paragraph was used in the highlights above)

She was breaking ground as a woman — and especially as a black woman — at the very beginning of the civil rights movement. She was a second-year medical school student when she wrote a letter to The Pittsburgh Courier, one of the nation’s leading black newspapers, urging prospective black students to apply. She later said of her white classmates, “We were a close-knit, supportive group.”

Dr. Francis married Olvin R. McBarnette, who survives her. Besides her daughter Elayne Sara, she is survived by five other children, all raised in Queens: Bruce, Camilla, Yvette, Ellen and Andrea, all with the surname McBarnette; three grandchildren; and a brother, Mac Francis.

Dr. Francis was first exposed to sickle cell anemia and its effects during her pediatrics residency at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago, which served a growing black population migrating from the South. She was the hospital’s first black medical intern.

“I went home and tested all my relatives,” she recalled.

She began practicing medicine at Bellevue Hospital in New York, became director of the sickle cell clinic at Jamaica Hospital and, later, with Dr. Doris L. Wethers and Lila A. Fenwick, started the Foundation for Research and Education in Sickle Cell Disease.

She retired in 2000 and moved to Virginia three years later to be closer to her grandchildren.

“When her first patients began living beyond adolescence, Dr. Francis referred them to doctors with adult practices. But when many of her former pediatric patients were reluctant to leave her, she decided, at 52, to pursue a residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in hematology at Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center so that she could continue to care for them.”

Among those patients was Maureen Michel, who was a 9-year-old visiting from Haiti in 1975 when she was hospitalized in New York and referred to Dr. Francis.

“My whole life, every time I go to the emergency room, I call Dr. Francis,” Ms. Michel told Yale Medicine, adding that she always asked, “Do you think this medication is good for me?”

“When she retired,” Ms. Michel said, “I didn’t know if I would ever find any doctor like her, and to tell you the truth, I never have.”

OneWorld  Progressive Institute, Inc., is a small group of committed volunteers who produce community information and education television programs on health literacy, education and civic engagement.  We also find good information and post informative blogs about issues we believe shine light and are beneficial to many in our communities.  Learn more about us at our web site: www.oneworldpi.org/  and visit our web health section at: http://www.oneworldpi.org/health/index.html  Please share our information with others. 

Watch our informative television programs on your public access channels: Frontier (formerly AT&T), Channel 99, drop down; Charter Communications Chan. 21, and Comcast (Xfinity) Channels 10, 15, 18 & 26. Like OneWorld on Face Book at: http://goo.gl/k17xvx  OneWorld’s YouTube is here: http://goo.gl/jkPaiQ – Prominent Jamaicans in New Haven; https://youtu.be/EDviuNG-cek – Cardiac Health; Dr. Hilary Brown, Cardiac and General surgeon.

Videos of other Jamaicans who have come to the USA and excelled in many areas of medicine and education: https://youtu.be/kes6coftZrM

We welcome technical and financial support to continue our work in the Greater New Haven community.

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Do Microwaves Degrade Food Nutrients?

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3 volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996. We welcome financial & technical support. oneworldpi.org/

Many of us are confused by the contradictory information we often receive when it comes to what is good or detrimental to our health and well being.  The New York Times is a source of reliable information.  It is one of the sources OneWorld relies on for good health-related information. Below is an article by Karen Weintraub about the benefits (or not) of using the microwave to cook and/or warm food.

Ask Well: Do Microwaves Degrade Food Nutrients? 

Question: Are there any good quality studies regarding loss of nutrients due to heating (not cooking) food in a microwave?
Answer: The microwave has gotten a bit of a bad rap about its effects on nutrients. Cooking and heating food by any method can result in some degradation of nutrients. Vitamins C and B12, for instance, degrade quickly when a food is heated. But other nutrients may actually benefit from the rise in temperature. For example, carotenoids, the antioxidants found in colorful vegetables like carrots and tomatoes, increase when the proteins that bind them break down during heating, said Guy Crosby, the science editor for America’s Test Kitchen and an adjunct associate professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
The Harvard Health Letter recently concluded that microwaving may be preferable to other methods for heating food. “Because microwave cooking times are shorter, cooking with a microwave does a better job of preserving vitamin C and other nutrients that break down when heated,” it reported. “The cooking method that best retains nutrients is one that cooks quickly, heats food for the shortest amount of time, and uses as little liquid as possible. Microwaving meets those criteria. Using the microwave with a small amount of water essentially steams food from the inside out. That keeps more vitamins and minerals than almost any other cooking method.”

However, Ashim Datta, a professor of food engineering at Cornell University, cautioned that because microwaves heat food unevenly, nutrients are more likely to be broken down in spots that get extremely hot. In some cases, Dr. Datta said, microwaving could lead to more degradation over all than another warming method.

To help avoid these problems, put a lid on food in the microwave to retain moisture, and keep the power relatively low to ensure that food is cooked rapidly, but not overheated, said Rebecca Solomon, director of clinical nutrition at Mount Sinai Beth Israel hospital in New York City.

But for people who eat a balanced diet, microwave heating is unlikely to have a meaningful effect, positive or negative, on nutritional intake.

Do you have a health question? Submit your question to Ask Well. http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/04/24/ask-well-do-microwaves-degrade-food-nutrients/

A few other resources can be found here: Healthy Recipes for Your Microwave

  1. http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows /healthy_recipes_for_your_microwave
  2. Easy Microwave Recipes – http://www.cookinglight.com/food/recipe-finder/microwave-recipes

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  • Healthy Microwave Meals:  https://www.pinterest.com/explore/healthy-microwave-meals/
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Danny Has Been the Biggest Loser In More Than One Way

OneWorld Progressive Institute

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a 501(C)3 volunteer organization serving Greater New Haven and the broader CT community since 1996. We welcome your support.

The New York Times has again done a great   public good in bringing to our attention what scientists are learning from the former NBC  Reality TV program called The Biggest Losers. The article is linked below; OneWorld has listed a few highlights, and encourage visitors to read the complete article.  Millions of Americans and people across the world struggle with extra pounds.  Some of us are on a constant diet.  Many of us just want to lose a few pounds and cannot seem to get that accomplished.  We think this article shed important light that might help us to lose weight and keep it off permanently.

Obesity is a major health problem in the USA.  Get some helpful facts.

  • Danny Cahill won Season 8 of NBC’s reality television show The Biggest Loser.”
  • He went from 430 to 191 at the end of the Season- an astonishing 239 pounds in 7 months.
  • According to the NY Times article, to date he has regained more than 100 pounds. His resting metabolism has been affected.
  • What does this mean for his overall health, and that of the other contestants, going forward? This article contains important health information we should all learn from the scientists.
  • Many of the 16 contestants for that season have regained most of the weight they had loss. Some are even heavier now! Anyone who struggles with weight should know this and understand why.
  • “Yet their experiences, while a bitter personal disappointment, have been a gift to science. A study of Season 8’s contestants has yielded surprising new discoveries about the physiology of obesity that help explain why so many people struggle unsuccessfully to keep off the weight they lose.” Scientists have been following these former weight loss contestants for the past 6 years. Find out what they have learned.
  • “It is frightening and amazing,” said Dr. Hall, an expert on metabolism at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, which is part of the National Institutes of Health. “I am just blown away.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/02/health/biggest-loser-weight-loss.html?

OneWorld Progressive Institute, Inc is a very small group of committed community volunteers.   We have been producing and presenting information programs on Health Literacy, Education and Civic Engagement since June 1996.   When resources allow we also sponsor oratory and essay competitions for middle and high school, critical-thinking teen forums and information community engagement forums.  We are doing less of these as we have no funding.  We invite you to visit our web site at and our specialty areas  such as: http://www.oneworldpi.org/health/health_videos.html, and www.oneworldpi.org/education, to see some of the remarkable programs we have done.  See our YouTube channel at: https://goo.gl/q3YhD6   Face Book is here: http://goo.gl/8v19VB  If you like what you see, please “LIKE” our FB page and please SHARE us with others.  We are all about good information and building a POSITIVE community.  Thanks again. We hope you will “Like” our work.   We welcome donations to pay for video production, editing and web maintenance.  Contributions can be made to OneWorld, Inc. P. O. Box 8662, New Haven, CT 06531.

We are a 501(C)3 organization.  All donations are tax deductible. 

N’Zinga Shäni, M.Sc., MBA

Executive Director & Program Manager

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